New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/down-down-and-towards-whistler/Down Down and Towards Whistler….


There’s a special alpine ride in the Sea to Sky Corridor near Whistler we’ve had the privilege of riding over the years. Only a select group of riders have had their hands on this well guarded piece of alpine single-track gold. That will all change shortly with a super cool WORCA project that is well underway.     Sunday morning we headed north to perhaps get one last lap on this gem before the crowds arrive. 

I dropped Juneau, Danielle and Mike off on the highway where the branch road starts towards the climb and continued with the vehicle to the Whistler Brewing Company where the trail would eventually spit us out. As I approached Function I realized that the Whistler Ironman was already underway and the cyclists were already on the highway. At 8:30am I zipped right past the volunteers and was now on the road with my Norco Range Carbon LE sporting a very large camera pack. On route I had a pretty cool conversation with an Ironman Triathlete from Chicago. We compared our epic day in front of us and agreed he had the bigger challenge in front of him. After an hour or so I caught up to my crew and joined the 1200m sufferfest climb.                              


We took a few breaks on route….

The heather was in full bloom…. 


We reached the alpine after about 3 hours and took a dip….  


It’s hard to get a more spectacular view of Rainbow Mountain….  




No words necessary….   

Unfortunately there are way too many idiots mostly on sleds shredding this area every winter. This is Whistler’s drinking water supply! Stay out!   

The Metal Dome…. 

And amazing views of the Tantalus Range towards Squamish where we found ourselves only a couple of weeks earlier…. Alpha is the pyramid shaped peak second from the right.        


We gotta go there!  

Wedge and the slopes of Blackcomb Mountain dominated the view as we dropped in….   





And after another epic 1200m descent we found ourselves indulging in a $  10 Beer and Burger!    

Back in Squamish the crew was spent. I sense most blogs with now end with variations of this photo at our own Squamish pub.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/down-down-and-towards-whistler/

Down Down and Towards Whistler….

There’s a special alpine ride in the Sea to Sky Corridor near Whistler we’ve had the privilege of riding over the years. Only a select group of riders have had their hands on this well guarded piece of alpine single-track gold. That will all change shortly with a super cool WORCA project that is well underway.     Sunday morning we headed north to perhaps get one last lap on this gem before the crowds arrive.

I dropped Juneau, Danielle and Mike off on the highway where the branch road starts towards the climb and continued with the vehicle to the Whistler Brewing Company where the trail would eventually spit us out. As I approached Function I realized that the Whistler Ironman was already underway and the cyclists were already on the highway. At 8:30am I zipped right past the volunteers and was now on the road with my Norco Range Carbon LE sporting a very large camera pack. On route I had a pretty cool conversation with an Ironman Triathlete from Chicago. We compared our epic day in front of us and agreed he had the bigger challenge in front of him. After an hour or so I caught up to my crew and joined the 1200m sufferfest climb.                              

We took a few breaks on route….

The heather was in full bloom….

We reached the alpine after about 3 hours and took a dip….  

It’s hard to get a more spectacular view of Rainbow Mountain….  

No words necessary….  

Unfortunately there are way too many idiots mostly on sleds shredding this area every winter. This is Whistler’s drinking water supply! Stay out!  

The Metal Dome….

And amazing views of the Tantalus Range towards Squamish where we found ourselves only a couple of weeks earlier…. Alpha is the pyramid shaped peak second from the right.        

We gotta go there!  

Wedge and the slopes of Blackcomb Mountain dominated the view as we dropped in….  

And after another epic 1200m descent we found ourselves indulging in a $ 10 Beer and Burger!    

Back in Squamish the crew was spent. I sense most blogs with now end with variations of this photo at our own Squamish pub.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/a-somewhat-dated-but-very-interesting-article-on-the-singularity-brassier-on-land-mp3-audio/a somewhat dated but very interesting article on the Singularity + Brassier on Land (Mp3 Audio)HERE.  I had been thinking about this in the context of Accelerationism, having listened to again Ray Brassier’s commentary on Nick Land, HERE from the 2010 Goldsmith’s Accelerationism event (full event link HERE).

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/a-somewhat-dated-but-very-interesting-article-on-the-singularity-brassier-on-land-mp3-audio/

a somewhat dated but very interesting article on the Singularity + Brassier on Land (Mp3 Audio)

HERE.  I had been thinking about this in the context of Accelerationism, having listened to again Ray Brassier’s commentary on Nick Land, HERE from the 2010 Goldsmith’s Accelerationism event (full event link HERE).

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/reading-the-austin-chronicle-on-a-sunny-afternoon/Reading the Austin Chronicle on a sunny afternoon.


©2013 and beyond.  Kirk Tuck.  Please do not re-post without full attribution.  Please use the Amazon Links on the site to help me finance this site.  See my work at www.kirktuck.com

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/reading-the-austin-chronicle-on-a-sunny-afternoon/

Reading the Austin Chronicle on a sunny afternoon.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/fishing-village-sketch-from-a-bridge/Fishing Village - Sketch from a BridgeDr Abe V Rotor


Living with Nature School on Blog







Paaralang Bayan sa Himpapawid with Ms Melly C Tenorio 







738 DZRB AM Band, 8 to 9 evening class, Monday to Friday




Fishing Village in Catbalogan pastel, by Mario Relampagos, Samar 1986

The art of on-the-spot sketching
lives not in the lens;
artists create, the photographer 
loses that divine sense. 

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/fishing-village-sketch-from-a-bridge/

Fishing Village - Sketch from a Bridge

Dr Abe V Rotor
Living with Nature School on Blog
Paaralang Bayan sa Himpapawid with Ms Melly C Tenorio 
738 DZRB AM Band, 8 to 9 evening class, Monday to Friday
Fishing Village in Catbalogan pastel, by Mario Relampagos, Samar 1986
The art of on-the-spot sketching
lives not in the lens;
artists create, the photographer 
loses that divine sense. 
New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/heike-odermatt-svalbard-feeling/Heike Odermatt - Svalbard feeling		
		In 2011 I was traveling with a few other Photographers by a small sailing boat along the west coast from Svalbard. Most of the fjords towards the North were full of ice, so that we were unable to reach it. Today the day Svalbard faced a creeping thaw too. How much longer we can see a scenery like this?

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/heike-odermatt-svalbard-feeling/

Heike Odermatt - Svalbard feeling



In 2011 I was traveling with a few other Photographers by a small sailing boat along the west coast from Svalbard. Most of the fjords towards the North were full of ice, so that we were unable to reach it. Today the day Svalbard faced a creeping thaw too. How much longer we can see a scenery like this?

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/moustache/Moustache!And it’s a Genghis Khan ‘stache, worn with a goatee, to boot!
See:

Limpet eating algae in the aquarium.
Seriously, though, if you look closely, you can see the scraping “teeth” on the radula. Here’s the photo, cropped and saturated:

The radula is like a conveyor belt with sharp cutting blades.
Limpets use a radula  to scrape algae from rocks.  The radula consists of evenly spaced horizontal rows of cusps or teeth on a supporting ribbon, each row comprising 2-6 cusps. Rows in some species number up to 200 or more.
From Limpets and Relatives, by Tom Carefoot, UBC.
Much like a tongue, the radula rolls outward, then is brought back with its load of algae, which then passes into the esophagus.

Cross-section of a limpet mouth. (Limpets and Relatives)
Sometimes, when the light is right, I can see tiny trails on the inside of the glass wall of the aquarium; limpet trails, where they’ve cleaned off the algae. They remind me of the snail trails in the algae on my old fence.

Snails are bigger, and hungrier; their trails are easy to see.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/moustache/

Moustache!

And it’s a Genghis Khan ‘stache, worn with a goatee, to boot!

See:

Limpet eating algae in the aquarium.

Seriously, though, if you look closely, you can see the scraping “teeth” on the radula. Here’s the photo, cropped and saturated:

The radula is like a conveyor belt with sharp cutting blades.
Limpets use a radula  to scrape algae from rocks.  The radula consists of evenly spaced horizontal rows of cusps or teeth on a supporting ribbon, each row comprising 2-6 cusps. Rows in some species number up to 200 or more.

From Limpets and Relatives, by Tom Carefoot, UBC.

Much like a tongue, the radula rolls outward, then is brought back with its load of algae, which then passes into the esophagus.

Cross-section of a limpet mouth. (Limpets and Relatives)

Sometimes, when the light is right, I can see tiny trails on the inside of the glass wall of the aquarium; limpet trails, where they’ve cleaned off the algae. They remind me of the snail trails in the algae on my old fence.

Snails are bigger, and hungrier; their trails are easy to see.
New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/long-lens-street-shooting-with-m-zuiko-75mm-f1-8-lens/Long Lens: Street Shooting with M.Zuiko 75mm F1.8 lensFirst of all, Selamat Hari Raya Aidilfitri to all my Muslim friends who celebrate! Maaf Zahir dan Batin. 

Hari Raya Puasa is quite a huge occasion in Malaysia, and we have the long weekend for the huge celebration. Therefore, that also meant more time for shutter therapy sessions. This time I decided to do something a little different, instead of using my usual favourite focal lengths (14mm, 25mm and 45mm) I have decided to shoot with an even longer focal length, 75mm. Armed with the amazing M.Zuiko 75mm F1.8 on an E-M1 I roamed the KL streets and little did I know I have enjoyed myself more than I expected!

One of the constantly propagated myth about using long lenses on the street is now disconnected your subjects will be in the photographs. I certainly find that not to be true at all. There is a difference between shooting with a long lens from a far distance from the subject, and shooting with a long lens by getting close to your subject. 75mm (in 35mm format, equals to 150mm) does not mean I can hide in one corner and started clicking away without my subject knowing me shooting them. I still do what I normally do: I walk in and approach the strangers. Interestingly the longer focal length allows tighter composition, meaning I have less background to work with and easily produced cleaner shots. 

The super thin depth of field that the Olympus 75mm F1.8 lens offers is simply amazing. I do not think (not even the Nocticron 42.5mm F1.2 lens) any lens from Micro Four Thirds at this moment can rival the shallow depth of field produced by the 75mm F1.8 lens. 

All images were taken with Olympus OM-D E-M1 and M.Zuiko 75mm F1.8 lens

Hard Worker


At the bus stop

Leaning on one side


Closed shops

the shortcut


Bokeh

heavy box


Hidden in the shade

Brothers


Beautiful smile

tele-communication


Long Exposure

Comfortable


Beautiful eyes

The backalley


Five Foot Way

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/long-lens-street-shooting-with-m-zuiko-75mm-f1-8-lens/

Long Lens: Street Shooting with M.Zuiko 75mm F1.8 lens

First of all, Selamat Hari Raya Aidilfitri to all my Muslim friends who celebrate! Maaf Zahir dan Batin. 
Hari Raya Puasa is quite a huge occasion in Malaysia, and we have the long weekend for the huge celebration. Therefore, that also meant more time for shutter therapy sessions. This time I decided to do something a little different, instead of using my usual favourite focal lengths (14mm, 25mm and 45mm) I have decided to shoot with an even longer focal length, 75mm. Armed with the amazing M.Zuiko 75mm F1.8 on an E-M1 I roamed the KL streets and little did I know I have enjoyed myself more than I expected!
One of the constantly propagated myth about using long lenses on the street is now disconnected your subjects will be in the photographs. I certainly find that not to be true at all. There is a difference between shooting with a long lens from a far distance from the subject, and shooting with a long lens by getting close to your subject. 75mm (in 35mm format, equals to 150mm) does not mean I can hide in one corner and started clicking away without my subject knowing me shooting them. I still do what I normally do: I walk in and approach the strangers. Interestingly the longer focal length allows tighter composition, meaning I have less background to work with and easily produced cleaner shots. 
The super thin depth of field that the Olympus 75mm F1.8 lens offers is simply amazing. I do not think (not even the Nocticron 42.5mm F1.2 lens) any lens from Micro Four Thirds at this moment can rival the shallow depth of field produced by the 75mm F1.8 lens. 

All images were taken with Olympus OM-D E-M1 and M.Zuiko 75mm F1.8 lens
Hard Worker

At the bus stop
Leaning on one side

Closed shops
the shortcut

Bokeh
heavy box

Hidden in the shade
Brothers

Beautiful smile
tele-communication

Long Exposure
Comfortable

Beautiful eyes
The backalley

Five Foot Way
New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/vermilion-flycatcher/Vermilion FlycatcherI am linking up with Wild Bird Wednesday and Nature Notes
For this week’s wild bird I am sharing the Vermilion Flycatcher. One of my favorite sightings in Belize..  This was not my first sighting of this bird, they are my first photos of the pretty Vermilion Flycatcher. I actually saw it during our one day visit to Belize while we were on a April 2006 Western Caribbean cruise and a cave-tubing excursion. This bird was seen during my birding tour near the Sittee River in  Hopkins Belize.  Part of our tour included some birding along the road  on the way to the river.. Whenever we spotted a bird we would stop to  view the bird up close and take photo if we wanted. 

The Vermilion Flycatcher is a stunning color unlike other drab flycatchers..The males are bright red and have dark brown plumage. They prefer open areas but usually near water. They eat insects such as flies, grasshoppers and beetles.

 
A different angle of the Vermilion Flycatcher showing dark brown plumage on it’s back and wings. It Is a gorgeous bird and one of my many favorites. 

 Thanks for stopping by my post and for all the nice comments.
Join in and post your birdies and to see more beautiful and wonderful bird photos please visit: Stewart’s Wild Bird Wednesday and Michelle’s  Nature Notes.  Thanks to our host Michelle our host Stewart.  Happy Birding and have a wonderful week!

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/vermilion-flycatcher/

Vermilion Flycatcher

I am linking up with Wild Bird Wednesday and Nature Notes

For this week’s wild bird I am sharing the Vermilion Flycatcher. One of my favorite sightings in Belize..  This was not my first sighting of this bird, they are my first photos of the pretty Vermilion Flycatcher. I actually saw it during our one day visit to Belize while we were on a April 2006 Western Caribbean cruise and a cave-tubing excursion.
This bird was seen during my birding tour near the Sittee River in Hopkins Belize.  Part of our tour included some birding along the road on the way to the river.. Whenever we spotted a bird we would stop to view the bird up close and take photo if we wanted.

The Vermilion Flycatcher is a stunning color unlike other drab flycatchers..The males are bright red and have dark brown plumage. They prefer open areas but usually near water. They eat insects such as flies, grasshoppers and beetles.

A different angle of the Vermilion Flycatcher showing dark brown plumage on it’s back and wings. It Is a gorgeous bird and one of my many favorites.

 Thanks for stopping by my post and for all the nice comments.

Join in and post your birdies and to see more beautiful and wonderful bird photos please visit:
 Stewart’s Wild Bird Wednesday and Michelle’s  Nature Notes.  Thanks to our host Michelle our host Stewart.  Happy Birding and have a wonderful week!

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/capturing-busy-little-ones-forget-the-perfect-pose-and-get-photos-you-truly-love/Capturing Busy Little Ones: Forget the Perfect Pose and Get Photos You Truly Love
If you have ever tried to get a three year old to sit still for longer than a nanosecond you know what a challenge it can be to get that “perfect” photo. Well, I’m going to be real here, who wants that perfect photo anyway? Okay, I know you may, but maybe I can convince you to let that go. My favorite photos are always the true ones; the ones that make you smile when you look at them, or maybe even cry a tear or two. Sure, it’s nice to get that beautiful portrait, but which photo is going to help you truly remember the fiery three year old who gave you model-in-the-making poses one minute, and wiped her muddy hands on her white shirt the next?
The first thing you have to do, if you want this experience to be fun for both you and the little one, is to let go of expectations. If you have a certain Pinterest pose in mind, and are determined not to be happy until you’ve forced your little tot into it, you’re both going to be miserable. Sure, use those ideas as a starting point, but then go with what is happening in the moment. You’ll be surprised where your wee subject might take you, and you might like the results much better than what you had in mind in the first place.


Make sure your cute little one knows that you are on the same team. Most kids have no problem being obstinate, just for fun. If she senses that you really want something from her, she may quickly decide that she wants the exact opposite. I try to take the child by the hand often, even if it’s the first time we’ve met (they usually love this) and let them feel that they are part of where we are going, and what we are doing. If she decides that she wants to put on the pretty dress shoes next, then that’s what we capture next.

Bring something for her to do. I prefer not to use props generally, but a few well-chosen, meaningful props can work wonders. This keeps her attention, plus you have the added benefit of capturing those hobbies that she is into at the moment. Let her share her passion with you. Instead of trying to pose her just so, and telling her how to hold the fishing pole, and where to look – ask her to show you “how she fishes with daddy”. Let her be the expert, and you just have your camera ready. Favorite dress-up clothes can bring out the model in lots of kids. Chairs or boxes to climb on, sit on, stand on, and peek through, can be great fun.

Try not to give too much direction or commands. Kids start to tune you out pretty quickly if all they hear are orders barked at them: “Sit here, look there, smile, smile, smile!!!”. When I can tell that my little subject is about done, I’ll just let her totally do her thing, and have my camera ready for when the moment is right. If she wants to take her shoes off and splash in the water, throwing rocks, I see a perfect opportunity to capture her in her element. This is where you might get the most genuine joy shining through.

When your mini-model is done – you are done. Quit before the meltdown, before she decides that this is the worst form of torture an adult ever created. If you didn’t get everything you hoped to get, don’t sweat it. Sometimes when I look through the photos later, I find gems that I didn’t even remember capturing. You may be pleasantly surprised by how many great images you were able to get, even with truly “busy” little tots. You’re not going to get much worth keeping if you try to force more photos. When little ones are done, they are DONE. Try to keep your photo sessions short, even if you have an agreeable little model. I usually spend less than half an hour shooting if they are under five years old.

So, next time you are lucky enough to have an adorable, energetic, little one in front of your camera, remember to relax, breathe, and have some fun. You’ll find that those real photos will be your favorites in the end, and you won’t even miss that perfectly posed portrait with every hair in place.

For more tips on photographing kids check out these:
Photography Hunting: Play the Waiting Game Photographing Kids
Cut the Cheese: 5 Tips for Photographing Kids
CLICK! How to Take Gorgeous Photos of Your Kids – a dPS ebook
How to Photograph Shy Children
The post Capturing Busy Little Ones: Forget the Perfect Pose and Get Photos You Truly Love by Melinda Smith appeared first on Digital Photography School.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/capturing-busy-little-ones-forget-the-perfect-pose-and-get-photos-you-truly-love/

Capturing Busy Little Ones: Forget the Perfect Pose and Get Photos You Truly Love

PHOTO 1

If you have ever tried to get a three year old to sit still for longer than a nanosecond you know what a challenge it can be to get that “perfect” photo. Well, I’m going to be real here, who wants that perfect photo anyway? Okay, I know you may, but maybe I can convince you to let that go. My favorite photos are always the true ones; the ones that make you smile when you look at them, or maybe even cry a tear or two. Sure, it’s nice to get that beautiful portrait, but which photo is going to help you truly remember the fiery three year old who gave you model-in-the-making poses one minute, and wiped her muddy hands on her white shirt the next?

The first thing you have to do, if you want this experience to be fun for both you and the little one, is to let go of expectations. If you have a certain Pinterest pose in mind, and are determined not to be happy until you’ve forced your little tot into it, you’re both going to be miserable. Sure, use those ideas as a starting point, but then go with what is happening in the moment. You’ll be surprised where your wee subject might take you, and you might like the results much better than what you had in mind in the first place.

PHOTO 2 PHOTO 3

Make sure your cute little one knows that you are on the same team. Most kids have no problem being obstinate, just for fun. If she senses that you really want something from her, she may quickly decide that she wants the exact opposite. I try to take the child by the hand often, even if it’s the first time we’ve met (they usually love this) and let them feel that they are part of where we are going, and what we are doing. If she decides that she wants to put on the pretty dress shoes next, then that’s what we capture next.

PHOTO 4

Bring something for her to do. I prefer not to use props generally, but a few well-chosen, meaningful props can work wonders. This keeps her attention, plus you have the added benefit of capturing those hobbies that she is into at the moment. Let her share her passion with you. Instead of trying to pose her just so, and telling her how to hold the fishing pole, and where to look – ask her to show you “how she fishes with daddy”. Let her be the expert, and you just have your camera ready. Favorite dress-up clothes can bring out the model in lots of kids. Chairs or boxes to climb on, sit on, stand on, and peek through, can be great fun.

PHOTO 5

Try not to give too much direction or commands. Kids start to tune you out pretty quickly if all they hear are orders barked at them: “Sit here, look there, smile, smile, smile!!!”. When I can tell that my little subject is about done, I’ll just let her totally do her thing, and have my camera ready for when the moment is right. If she wants to take her shoes off and splash in the water, throwing rocks, I see a perfect opportunity to capture her in her element. This is where you might get the most genuine joy shining through.

PHOTO 6

When your mini-model is done – you are done. Quit before the meltdown, before she decides that this is the worst form of torture an adult ever created. If you didn’t get everything you hoped to get, don’t sweat it. Sometimes when I look through the photos later, I find gems that I didn’t even remember capturing. You may be pleasantly surprised by how many great images you were able to get, even with truly “busy” little tots. You’re not going to get much worth keeping if you try to force more photos. When little ones are done, they are DONE. Try to keep your photo sessions short, even if you have an agreeable little model. I usually spend less than half an hour shooting if they are under five years old.

PHOTO 7

So, next time you are lucky enough to have an adorable, energetic, little one in front of your camera, remember to relax, breathe, and have some fun. You’ll find that those real photos will be your favorites in the end, and you won’t even miss that perfectly posed portrait with every hair in place.

PHOTO 8

For more tips on photographing kids check out these:

The post Capturing Busy Little Ones: Forget the Perfect Pose and Get Photos You Truly Love by Melinda Smith appeared first on Digital Photography School.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/rural-views-part-12-a-family-outing/Rural Views [Part 1/2]: A Family Outing
We visited the countryside recently for a family gathering. While there, my cousins decided to take a walk through the rural setting, and I made a couple of images. We had a great time, which resulted in cca. 100 images, from which I selected 37 to show to you in these two parts.

So come along with us and enjoy the sights!
This is a multi-part series:Part One: A Family OutingPart Two: The Path through the Woods
click on the images for a bigger view


This place is called Bivolje Brdo, and is located 27 km (ca. 17 miles) south from Mostar. It’s a short 30 minute car ride to get here.



Before we started our walk, I noticed this abandoned house. The grapes were hanging from the vine, which offered a melancholic view. Somehow life was still going on here.

Beni was there as well of course. The hike took us through the local fields, where, after some rainy days, nature was in full bloom.


A shallow depth of field shot, transformed the scenery in this next landscape in a unique way. I did a tutorial on this technique. If you are interested you can check it out here. 


We had a lot of rain the last couple of days, and it was even raining on this day just before our walk. That’s why you will notice raindrops in all of the close-up shots. 




This next view brings back memories form the beginning of this blog. This was one of the first sights I shoot with my Canon 350D back then, and posted to this blog in January of 2009. If you’d like to see this scene five years back, click here. 


We actually picked some berries (not these unripe ones, of course) as we were strolling along. They were very delicious! 





The newest addition to the family, my cousin Kenan’s daugther Merjem, wasn’t in a walking mood.   As the sun returned, so did the humidity, and she wasn’t a fan of it, and neither were we. 


A lone fence was in front of me, and I was wondering, what can it protect the field from? Right now it’s only an interesting photo subject, so I snapped away.






A distant view into the village of Bivolje Brdo. We were traveling away from it now, further into previously uncharted (and undocumented) territory for me. 


As we were moving along, so did other creatures. Unfortunately for me (and for you, dear visitors) the turtle decided to hide as soon as I pointed the camera at her. 


As we took a corner, a long path through the woods waited for us. The entrance was very nice and charming, but further back nature was running wild. You will see what we saw in the woods in part two…


End of Part One
To be continued…

I hope you enjoyed the first part from our countryside visit. Part Two will be up tomorrow (where you will actually see more from us).

I am still editing the summer vacation series to Sibenik, Croatia, but I plan to post part one on Friday. So there is a lot of new material coming up.

Linking to Sweet Shot Tuesday, Nature Notes  Our World Tuesday

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/07/rural-views-part-12-a-family-outing/

Rural Views [Part 1/2]: A Family Outing

We visited the countryside recently for a family gathering. While there, my cousins decided to take a walk through the rural setting, and I made a couple of images. We had a great time, which resulted in cca. 100 images, from which I selected 37 to show to you in these two parts.
So come along with us and enjoy the sights!

This is a multi-part series:
Part One: A Family Outing
Part Two: The Path through the Woods

click on the images for a bigger view

This place is called Bivolje Brdo, and is located 27 km (ca. 17 miles) south from Mostar. It’s a short 30 minute car ride to get here.

Before we started our walk, I noticed this abandoned house. The grapes were hanging from the vine, which offered a melancholic view. Somehow life was still going on here.

Beni was there as well of course. The hike took us through the local fields, where, after some rainy days, nature was in full bloom.

A shallow depth of field shot, transformed the scenery in this next landscape in a unique way. I did a tutorial on this technique. If you are interested you can check it out here.

We had a lot of rain the last couple of days, and it was even raining on this day just before our walk. That’s why you will notice raindrops in all of the close-up shots.

This next view brings back memories form the beginning of this blog. This was one of the first sights I shoot with my Canon 350D back then, and posted to this blog in January of 2009. If you’d like to see this scene five years back, click here.

We actually picked some berries (not these unripe ones, of course) as we were strolling along. They were very delicious!

The newest addition to the family, my cousin Kenan’s daugther Merjem, wasn’t in a walking mood. :) As the sun returned, so did the humidity, and she wasn’t a fan of it, and neither were we.

A lone fence was in front of me, and I was wondering, what can it protect the field from? Right now it’s only an interesting photo subject, so I snapped away.

A distant view into the village of Bivolje Brdo. We were traveling away from it now, further into previously uncharted (and undocumented) territory for me.

As we were moving along, so did other creatures. Unfortunately for me (and for you, dear visitors) the turtle decided to hide as soon as I pointed the camera at her.

As we took a corner, a long path through the woods waited for us. The entrance was very nice and charming, but further back nature was running wild. You will see what we saw in the woods in part two…

End of Part One
To be continued…
I hope you enjoyed the first part from our countryside visit. Part Two will be up tomorrow (where you will actually see more from us).
I am still editing the summer vacation series to Sibenik, Croatia, but I plan to post part one on Friday. So there is a lot of new material coming up.