New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/red-necked-phalarope-utra-scrape-08082014/Red-necked Phalarope, Utra Scrape 08/08/2014I thought I would do a mini blog post on what could be classed as my first self found rarity here on Fair Isle.
I’d just come back from the Observatory after seeing my first Greenish Warbler of the year which had been trapped at the Plantation and I thought I’d have a quick check of the Utra Scrape for any Waders.I cycled down the road until I got to Utra and then I walked out to the Scrape, arriving at 11:40.I had a few glimpses of the area before I started to crawl (I’m cautious) to a spot where I could see the whole Scrape.I saw a bird swimming around and my camera was quickly raised, I took a few distant shots and I had a look, it looked like a Phalarope…. but it couldn’t  be a Phalarope. Could it?

The first shot of my Phalarope rarity (in Fair Isle terms).

Zoomed fully but easy to see
I took a few more shots and I started to half crawl/half crouch my way forward to get a closer look.Us birders can be called strange or a few anyway but some people go to lengths to see their birds.I stopped and I rattled off a few more photos of the bird and I was certain that it was a Phalarope, now time to eliminate the three species.
1st of all, Wilson’s Phalarope.. seen the bird in the book and the colours were all wrong, so that one was out.
2nd. Grey Phalarope, not the right colours and pattern… that’s gone as well.
3rd and final Phalarope, the Red-necked, breeds on Fetlar (Shetland) and they have just left their breeding grounds… the pattern and colour fitted that of a juvenile (from the Collins Guide as I remember, but I didn’t have it on me!).
So finally I decided that this was a Red-necked Phalarope…. year tick and an island tick. I wasn’t sure how rare it was but it had to be good right? I put out the call and Ciaran came (on census) over a style on the opposite side of the the Scrape about 40 metres off. I thought to myself… Wait…. he won’t see the bird from that side, he might flush it!!So first thought in mind without shouting, waving my arms frantically to get his attention, it worked and he gave the Scrape a wide berth.I got up and half ran to meet him, straight away I told him that I had a Red-necked Phalarope on the Scrape, we both turned and we could just see the bird bobbing around.Ciaran got it and said that it was a juvenile! and even a British tick for him! he got straight on the phone to David and I got on to Quoy.Triona picked up and I told her that I had a Red-necked Phalarope at the Utra Scrape and she went off to tell Stewart and Dad.

The Phalarope, its actually sitting still for once!
So now we just waited, David came running and we put him into the bird.Within ten minutes the Obs van had showed up, partially full and a few people came out to see the bird, Stewart and Dad from Quoy came as well with Brian and his son Alan (Houll), Nick and Elizabeth (Schoolton) and that was it (for now).Everybody got good looks at the bird as it fed on flies and swam about, people came and went and a few from the Obs (four at least with another one coming later.
I wasn’t the last to leave but I was hungry so I headed back to Quoy for denner and afterwards I headed straight out to go video the Phalarope and maybe get some better shots.When I arrived I saw that three people were watching the Phalarope, Glen Tyler and a couple who’d come in on a yacht.I went up to them and I joined in with the mini-twitch, everyone was having great views and I went and got some video and pics with Glen joining me afterwards.

Still for a split second before it starts off again

As you can see food is in no short supply


The Utra Scrape, Waders Love it, Phalaropes Love it, Birders Love it












One of the few times it was out of water

My final photo of the Red-necked Phalarope, maybe even the last anybody took of it on Fair Isle
I watched this Phalarope for long enough to see some of its behaviour, it would frantically go about catching flies (I presume) for over 15 minutes and then it would find a hidden spot and it would sit, resting, preening itself for five minutes before starting the cycle again and it did this about three times.
I did have some video but due to problems with uploading it, it’s not going to be with the post at the moment.
At least a total of 16 people had a look at the Phalarope during its short stay of roughly 4 hours but Tommy and Henry missed it by a mere hour as they were just coming back from America!
My last sighting of the bird was at 14:40 and I haven’t heard of anyone else seeing it but under an hour later Ciaran went and there was no sign.
This Red-necked Phalarope consisted of the 23rd record of the species on Fair Isle, with a total of only 25 birds and the first sighting since 2005 seeing them here can be a bit tricky.
In terms of rare-ness, this bird was the rarest of the Autumn on Fair Isle (and it still is by early September!), well if you exclude the Swinhoe’s Petrel which made its last appearance on the 1st.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/red-necked-phalarope-utra-scrape-08082014/

Red-necked Phalarope, Utra Scrape 08/08/2014

I thought I would do a mini blog post on what could be classed as my first self found rarity here on Fair Isle.

I’d just come back from the Observatory after seeing my first Greenish Warbler of the year which had been trapped at the Plantation and I thought I’d have a quick check of the Utra Scrape for any Waders.
I cycled down the road until I got to Utra and then I walked out to the Scrape, arriving at 11:40.
I had a few glimpses of the area before I started to crawl (I’m cautious) to a spot where I could see the whole Scrape.
I saw a bird swimming around and my camera was quickly raised, I took a few distant shots and I had a look, it looked like a Phalarope…. but it couldn’t  be a Phalarope. Could it?

The first shot of my Phalarope rarity (in Fair Isle terms).
Zoomed fully but easy to see

I took a few more shots and I started to half crawl/half crouch my way forward to get a closer look.
Us birders can be called strange or a few anyway but some people go to lengths to see their birds.
I stopped and I rattled off a few more photos of the bird and I was certain that it was a Phalarope, now time to eliminate the three species.

1st of all, Wilson’s Phalarope.. seen the bird in the book and the colours were all wrong, so that one was out.

2nd. Grey Phalarope, not the right colours and pattern… that’s gone as well.

3rd and final Phalarope, the Red-necked, breeds on Fetlar (Shetland) and they have just left their breeding grounds… the pattern and colour fitted that of a juvenile (from the Collins Guide as I remember, but I didn’t have it on me!).

So finally I decided that this was a Red-necked Phalarope…. year tick and an island tick. I wasn’t sure how rare it was but it had to be good right? I put out the call and Ciaran came (on census) over a style on the opposite side of the the Scrape about 40 metres off. I thought to myself… Wait…. he won’t see the bird from that side, he might flush it!!
So first thought in mind without shouting, waving my arms frantically to get his attention, it worked and he gave the Scrape a wide berth.
I got up and half ran to meet him, straight away I told him that I had a Red-necked Phalarope on the Scrape, we both turned and we could just see the bird bobbing around.
Ciaran got it and said that it was a juvenile! and even a British tick for him! he got straight on the phone to David and I got on to Quoy.
Triona picked up and I told her that I had a Red-necked Phalarope at the Utra Scrape and she went off to tell Stewart and Dad.

The Phalarope, its actually sitting still for once!

So now we just waited, David came running and we put him into the bird.
Within ten minutes the Obs van had showed up, partially full and a few people came out to see the bird, Stewart and Dad from Quoy came as well with Brian and his son Alan (Houll), Nick and Elizabeth (Schoolton) and that was it (for now).
Everybody got good looks at the bird as it fed on flies and swam about, people came and went and a few from the Obs (four at least with another one coming later.

I wasn’t the last to leave but I was hungry so I headed back to Quoy for denner and afterwards I headed straight out to go video the Phalarope and maybe get some better shots.
When I arrived I saw that three people were watching the Phalarope, Glen Tyler and a couple who’d come in on a yacht.
I went up to them and I joined in with the mini-twitch, everyone was having great views and I went and got some video and pics with Glen joining me afterwards.

Still for a split second before it starts off again
As you can see food is in no short supply

The Utra Scrape, Waders Love it, Phalaropes Love it, Birders Love it

One of the few times it was out of water
My final photo of the Red-necked Phalarope, maybe even the last anybody took of it on Fair Isle

I watched this Phalarope for long enough to see some of its behaviour, it would frantically go about catching flies (I presume) for over 15 minutes and then it would find a hidden spot and it would sit, resting, preening itself for five minutes before starting the cycle again and it did this about three times.

I did have some video but due to problems with uploading it, it’s not going to be with the post at the moment.

At least a total of 16 people had a look at the Phalarope during its short stay of roughly 4 hours but Tommy and Henry missed it by a mere hour as they were just coming back from America!

My last sighting of the bird was at 14:40 and I haven’t heard of anyone else seeing it but under an hour later Ciaran went and there was no sign.

This Red-necked Phalarope consisted of the 23rd record of the species on Fair Isle, with a total of only 25 birds and the first sighting since 2005 seeing them here can be a bit tricky.

In terms of rare-ness, this bird was the rarest of the Autumn on Fair Isle (and it still is by early September!), well if you exclude the Swinhoe’s Petrel which made its last appearance on the 1st.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/olive-backed-pipit-and-barred-warbler-21-sept-2014/Olive-backed Pipit and Barred Warbler, 21 Sept 2014I admit to have been very slack with birding in the last month, mainly because I’ve been so busy with work and other commitments. This afternoon I had a little time to spare after some urban exploring with Belinda and as we were in Fakenham it would have been very shoddy not to have had a little time on the coast. Before really birding I’d almost had a Barn Owl take my head off while exploring some old farm buildings and a Red Kite flew over the B1105 just south of Wells.
My main target was the Olive-backed Pipit in Wells Dell, a species I’d not seen for some years. It didn’t disappoint, showing nicely on and off on the south side of the Dell under the trees to a small assembled crowd.
Then it was a streak along the coast to Salthouse to fill my boots with some great views of Barred Warbler in brambles on Gramborough Hill. Unusually I jammed in within 2 minutes of arrival having expected to need some patience!

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/olive-backed-pipit-and-barred-warbler-21-sept-2014/

Olive-backed Pipit and Barred Warbler, 21 Sept 2014

I admit to have been very slack with birding in the last month, mainly because I’ve been so busy with work and other commitments. This afternoon I had a little time to spare after some urban exploring with Belinda and as we were in Fakenham it would have been very shoddy not to have had a little time on the coast. Before really birding I’d almost had a Barn Owl take my head off while exploring some old farm buildings and a Red Kite flew over the B1105 just south of Wells.

My main target was the Olive-backed Pipit in Wells Dell, a species I’d not seen for some years. It didn’t disappoint, showing nicely on and off on the south side of the Dell under the trees to a small assembled crowd.

Then it was a streak along the coast to Salthouse to fill my boots with some great views of Barred Warbler in brambles on Gramborough Hill. Unusually I jammed in within 2 minutes of arrival having expected to need some patience!

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/streettogs-academy-assignment-no-4/Streettogs Academy Assignment No. 4
Thank you to all the street photographers who are keeping our Streettogs Academy Facebook page a very nice and active community. Thank you for all of your participation and to Jomel “Dada Bear” Bartolome for our previous assignment. Our Assignment no. 3 editor’s choice, Bertrand Domas came up with a nice assignment for us. It was inspired by one of his favorite photographers. To pull it off, you need to have mastery of one of the basic types of light a street photographer encounters.
Given those thoughts, Bertand’s assignment for us is….


Alex Webb’s The suffering of light is one of Bertrand’s favorite photographic works. The book has extensive use of the strong light which gives great contrast and if used correctly, you can create great silhouettes. Another photographer that uses this is Constantine Manos shown through his work, American Color.
Strong light usually comes out during the golden hour but when the evening comes, you can try to find spot lights or city lights that emit a strong light. Try and be creative and try to avoid the obvious.
Here are the mechanics:

Upload your photos interpreting the theme in the designated assignment album!
No words and captions, just your name, and place where you took the photo.
On the comment on your own photo, post a link to your site (flickr, tumblr, webpage etc.) so that your photo would easily appear on the group’s feed. (Please do it only once)
Feel free to use film, digital, instant film, mobile phones, etc. Any Camera will do
Keep the file appropriate for web viewing (at least 72 dpi), no need for hi-resolution.
Other things to know:

We encourage you to shoot during the duration of the 2 weeks instead of raiding your archives.
It should go without saying but please post photos that you own.
This assignment will run from Sept. 18 to Oct. 2 2014
Don’t hesitate to ask questions or clarifications in the group page.
Be open to learning, get up to the challenge, and of course have fun doing it!

At the end of the 2 weeks we will have an editor’s choice picked by Eric and myself and community’s choice which garners the most reactions from the community through likes and comments. We will feature the selections on a post here on the blog. The Winner of the editor’s choice, gets to pick the theme for the next assignment!

If you want additional info about the Streettogs Academy, check my introductory post here

For those who want join the group and take on the assignments, Click Here to head on to the Streettogs Academy Facebook Page


 
The post Streettogs Academy Assignment No. 4 appeared first on Eric Kim Street Photography Blog.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/streettogs-academy-assignment-no-4/

Streettogs Academy Assignment No. 4

assignment 4 announcement Streettogs Academy Assignment No. 4

Thank you to all the street photographers who are keeping our Streettogs Academy Facebook page a very nice and active community. Thank you for all of your participation and to Jomel “Dada Bear” Bartolome for our previous assignment. Our Assignment no. 3 editor’s choice, Bertrand Domas came up with a nice assignment for us. It was inspired by one of his favorite photographers. To pull it off, you need to have mastery of one of the basic types of light a street photographer encounters.

Given those thoughts, Bertand’s assignment for us is….

Assignment 4 theme Streettogs Academy Assignment No. 4

Alex Webb’s The suffering of light is one of Bertrand’s favorite photographic works. The book has extensive use of the strong light which gives great contrast and if used correctly, you can create great silhouettes. Another photographer that uses this is Constantine Manos shown through his work, American Color.

Strong light usually comes out during the golden hour but when the evening comes, you can try to find spot lights or city lights that emit a strong light. Try and be creative and try to avoid the obvious.

Here are the mechanics:

  • Upload your photos interpreting the theme in the designated assignment album!
  • No words and captions, just your name, and place where you took the photo.
  • On the comment on your own photo, post a link to your site (flickr, tumblr, webpage etc.) so that your photo would easily appear on the group’s feed. (Please do it only once)
  • Feel free to use film, digital, instant film, mobile phones, etc. Any Camera will do
  • Keep the file appropriate for web viewing (at least 72 dpi), no need for hi-resolution.

Other things to know:

  • We encourage you to shoot during the duration of the 2 weeks instead of raiding your archives.
  • It should go without saying but please post photos that you own.
  • This assignment will run from Sept. 18 to Oct. 2 2014
  • Don’t hesitate to ask questions or clarifications in the group page.
  • Be open to learning, get up to the challenge, and of course have fun doing it!
At the end of the 2 weeks we will have an editor’s choice picked by Eric and myself and community’s choice which garners the most reactions from the community through likes and comments. We will feature the selections on a post here on the blog. The Winner of the editor’s choice, gets to pick the theme for the next assignment!
If you want additional info about the Streettogs Academy, check my introductory post here
For those who want join the group and take on the assignments, Click Here to head on to the Streettogs Academy Facebook Page

 

The post Streettogs Academy Assignment No. 4 appeared first on Eric Kim Street Photography Blog.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/20-tips-for-photographing-historical-reenactments-and-festivals/20 Tips for Photographing Historical Reenactments and FestivalsNo matter what the season, people love to congregate in special places to celebrate or commemorate special events. Here are some tips that may help you take maximum advantage of the opportunities that festivals and historical reenactments present.

#1 Research the event before you go
Do some homework before you attend the event, to get an idea of the subject of the celebration, and something of its history. For example, if you are attending a battle reenactment, a little research before you arrive may give you an inside advantage as to how the battle may unfold in front of you. Even local street festivals exist for a celebration, so know what you can expect to experience, such as special displays, parades, entertainers, and fireworks.
#2 Know the rules of the event
For instance, some events may not allow you to bring coolers or large backpacks into a crowded venue, which could include your camera bag. Prepare accordingly to abide by the rules.
#3 Acquire a schedule of events and map of the venue before arriving
You’ll know ahead of time when to arrive and which locations you would like to shoot first.
#4 Develop a shot list
Preparing a shot list is a good way to help you to get all the images that you intend to capture. It is so easy to get caught up in a single attraction, then, when day is done, realize that you missed a lot of other shooting opportunities. So give yourself a game plan for the day, remembering that schedules can be flexible.
#5 Arrive early and stay late
The early bird gets the worm or the best parking place. Of course we know the best light of the day is during the early morning and pre-sunset, so arrive early and stay late to take advantage of it. Also, at many events the crowds don’t arrive until midday, and many who arrive early may also leave early.
Sunrise at the Ohio River Sternwheel Festival gives a colorful view of the event before the crowds arrive.

#6 Bring a compass
Upon arriving it is very important to get your bearings, which may require taking a compass reading. This becomes very important when looking to for the best lighting and vantage point from which to shoot.
#7 Meet the people involved with event logistics
Interaction with the event coordinators, staff, participants or re-enactors of an event can be very beneficial to you when it comes to getting inside information, and perhaps some behind-the-scenes shots. In some cases getting to know the right person might land you a unique vantage point, not accessible to the public. Offering to send photos to them can also be great way to get access to some great images. (Don’t forget to get contact information.)
#8 Be prepared
Always bring a spare camera battery. There is nothing worse than missing a great shot because your battery went dead. Spare memory cards are a must also, because you could be shooting thousands of photos each day and you want to have enough memory with you to hold all your images. For shooting in the middle of the day, in the harshest lighting conditions with deep shadows, consider using your pop-up flash to provide fill light for close-ups and portraits.
#9 Prepare for weather
Be prepared by checking the weather forecast ahead of time. You may find yourself standing for long periods of time in the direct sunlight, so sun screen is a must. Also bring plenty of water to stay hydrated. A wide brim hat can also be useful to keep the sun out of your eyes. Your equipment also may need protection from weather elements, especially moisture related.
#10 Be aware of the wind direction
Wind direction can be very important if you are photographing an event where there will be weapons (e.g. canons) fired. If your shooting location is downwind from the action, all you may get in your image is a lot of smoke. In some cases this could add some very interesting effects but, it is best to be aware of this ahead of time.
#11 Play nice with re-enactors and other photographers
Sometimes photographing these events can mean shooting in very crowded locations with everyone wanting to get that same great shot. Be courteous to your fellow photographers, interact with the people around you and work to help everyone have a great experience. Offer suggestions that might be helpful to those who are obviously less experienced. Also, remember festival workers are providing a service to you and in many cases it might be for very little or no pay, so be considerate of them.
#12 Choose an appropriate lens
A good walk-around lens, like a 28-300mm or 18-200mm zoom, is a desirable choice for these types of events and will allow you to use the same lens all day. However, if such an item is not in your arsenal, narrow your options down to just a couple of lenses, like a wide angle and a 200mm or 300mm telephoto.  If you choose to use multiple lenses, remember there can be lots of dust in the air at outdoor festivals, so you need to be careful while changing them not to get dust in your camera, which will find its way onto your sensor. If you must change lenses it would be a good idea to try to find a dust-free area, (your car would be a good spot, if parked nearby).
#13 Shoot with a higher ISO if necessary
Raising your ISO will allow the shutter speed to stop the action and aperture to maximize your depth of field. However, in some instances a narrow depth of field may be useful to make your subject stand out from the background.
#14 Watch your background
When you are shooting at a reenactment event, the last thing you want in an otherwise perfect image is a car or other object that will seem historically out of place in the background. In some cases you can remove these objects in post-production, but it is best to avoid them, and look for a different vantage point that allows you to exclude them.

#15 Look for details
Be observant to discover details that may make your shots stand out from all the other photographers shooting at the same location. Look for expressions on the faces of participants and spectators, as well as interactions between them.
Two officers standing at the fence discussing battle strategy.

This image captured from ground level, features a unique detailed view of reenactment maneuvers.

#16 Think safety
Remember to keep in mind where you are, when you are looking through your lens for an extended period of time. It is easy to lose track of just how close to the action you might have become.
#17 Tell a story
You’ve heard it said that picture is worth a thousand words, so look for images that tell a story. It doesn’t make much difference how well the photo is composed, that your exposure is correct and image is in sharp focus, if the shot doesn’t communicate the event experience to the viewer.
Lady in period dress, watching and waiting, tells a story.

#18 Attend more than one day
If possible, returning for a second day can allow you to get some really great images. After attending the first day, it becomes easier to anticipate the action (especially in the case of a reenactment event), pick up other happenings missed the first day, or re-shoot favorite subjects with alternate lighting and camera settings.
#19 Capture images that may interest the event organizers
Often times festivals or events are looking for images to use for next year’s promotional material. Depending on the event’s budget, some might even offer to pay for desirable images, while others may not be able to offer more than a byline (it’s still very cool to see your images published). Many events hold a photo contest that pays prize money and features the winning image in promotional material. You should give such an opportunity your best shot.
Shoot images that might interest event organizers, such as this image from the Ohio River Sternwheel Festival held in Marietta, Ohio.

#20 Give your photos a vintage effect in post-production
Giving your image a nice sepia tone to match the photos of former eras can be an interesting way to present reenactment or old-time feeling events.  Click on this link to download an American Civil War Lightroom preset. This preset will give you the era’s sepia tone effect, with faded corners and added grain.

Remember to have fun when you are photographing events and festivals. It is easy to get so involved with getting that perfect shot that you don’t take the time to enjoy the experience. Please share some of your favorite reenactment or festival shots.
The post 20 Tips for Photographing Historical Reenactments and Festivals by Bruce Wunderlich appeared first on Digital Photography School.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/20-tips-for-photographing-historical-reenactments-and-festivals/

20 Tips for Photographing Historical Reenactments and Festivals

No matter what the season, people love to congregate in special places to celebrate or commemorate special events. Here are some tips that may help you take maximum advantage of the opportunities that festivals and historical reenactments present.

firing the canon

#1 Research the event before you go

Do some homework before you attend the event, to get an idea of the subject of the celebration, and something of its history. For example, if you are attending a battle reenactment, a little research before you arrive may give you an inside advantage as to how the battle may unfold in front of you. Even local street festivals exist for a celebration, so know what you can expect to experience, such as special displays, parades, entertainers, and fireworks.

#2 Know the rules of the event

For instance, some events may not allow you to bring coolers or large backpacks into a crowded venue, which could include your camera bag. Prepare accordingly to abide by the rules.

#3 Acquire a schedule of events and map of the venue before arriving

You’ll know ahead of time when to arrive and which locations you would like to shoot first.

#4 Develop a shot list

Preparing a shot list is a good way to help you to get all the images that you intend to capture. It is so easy to get caught up in a single attraction, then, when day is done, realize that you missed a lot of other shooting opportunities. So give yourself a game plan for the day, remembering that schedules can be flexible.

#5 Arrive early and stay late

The early bird gets the worm or the best parking place. Of course we know the best light of the day is during the early morning and pre-sunset, so arrive early and stay late to take advantage of it. Also, at many events the crowds don’t arrive until midday, and many who arrive early may also leave early.

Sunrise at the Ohio River Sternwheel Festival gives a colorful view of the event before the crowds arrive.

Sunrise at the Ohio River Sternwheel Festival gives a colorful view of the event before the crowds arrive.

#6 Bring a compass

Upon arriving it is very important to get your bearings, which may require taking a compass reading. This becomes very important when looking to for the best lighting and vantage point from which to shoot.

#7 Meet the people involved with event logistics

Interaction with the event coordinators, staff, participants or re-enactors of an event can be very beneficial to you when it comes to getting inside information, and perhaps some behind-the-scenes shots. In some cases getting to know the right person might land you a unique vantage point, not accessible to the public. Offering to send photos to them can also be great way to get access to some great images. (Don’t forget to get contact information.)

#8 Be prepared

Always bring a spare camera battery. There is nothing worse than missing a great shot because your battery went dead. Spare memory cards are a must also, because you could be shooting thousands of photos each day and you want to have enough memory with you to hold all your images. For shooting in the middle of the day, in the harshest lighting conditions with deep shadows, consider using your pop-up flash to provide fill light for close-ups and portraits.

#9 Prepare for weather

Be prepared by checking the weather forecast ahead of time. You may find yourself standing for long periods of time in the direct sunlight, so sun screen is a must. Also bring plenty of water to stay hydrated. A wide brim hat can also be useful to keep the sun out of your eyes. Your equipment also may need protection from weather elements, especially moisture related.

#10 Be aware of the wind direction

Wind direction can be very important if you are photographing an event where there will be weapons (e.g. canons) fired. If your shooting location is downwind from the action, all you may get in your image is a lot of smoke. In some cases this could add some very interesting effects but, it is best to be aware of this ahead of time.

#11 Play nice with re-enactors and other photographers

Sometimes photographing these events can mean shooting in very crowded locations with everyone wanting to get that same great shot. Be courteous to your fellow photographers, interact with the people around you and work to help everyone have a great experience. Offer suggestions that might be helpful to those who are obviously less experienced. Also, remember festival workers are providing a service to you and in many cases it might be for very little or no pay, so be considerate of them.

#12 Choose an appropriate lens

A good walk-around lens, like a 28-300mm or 18-200mm zoom, is a desirable choice for these types of events and will allow you to use the same lens all day. However, if such an item is not in your arsenal, narrow your options down to just a couple of lenses, like a wide angle and a 200mm or 300mm telephoto.  If you choose to use multiple lenses, remember there can be lots of dust in the air at outdoor festivals, so you need to be careful while changing them not to get dust in your camera, which will find its way onto your sensor. If you must change lenses it would be a good idea to try to find a dust-free area, (your car would be a good spot, if parked nearby).

#13 Shoot with a higher ISO if necessary

Raising your ISO will allow the shutter speed to stop the action and aperture to maximize your depth of field. However, in some instances a narrow depth of field may be useful to make your subject stand out from the background.

#14 Watch your background

When you are shooting at a reenactment event, the last thing you want in an otherwise perfect image is a car or other object that will seem historically out of place in the background. In some cases you can remove these objects in post-production, but it is best to avoid them, and look for a different vantage point that allows you to exclude them.

DSC_9671-Edit-2

#15 Look for details

Be observant to discover details that may make your shots stand out from all the other photographers shooting at the same location. Look for expressions on the faces of participants and spectators, as well as interactions between them.

Two officers standing at the fence discussing battle strategy.

Two officers standing at the fence discussing battle strategy.

Look for detail

This image captured from ground level, features a unique detailed view of reenactment maneuvers.

#16 Think safety

Remember to keep in mind where you are, when you are looking through your lens for an extended period of time. It is easy to lose track of just how close to the action you might have become.

#17 Tell a story

You’ve heard it said that picture is worth a thousand words, so look for images that tell a story. It doesn’t make much difference how well the photo is composed, that your exposure is correct and image is in sharp focus, if the shot doesn’t communicate the event experience to the viewer.

Lady in era dress watching and waiting, tells a story

Lady in period dress, watching and waiting, tells a story.

#18 Attend more than one day

If possible, returning for a second day can allow you to get some really great images. After attending the first day, it becomes easier to anticipate the action (especially in the case of a reenactment event), pick up other happenings missed the first day, or re-shoot favorite subjects with alternate lighting and camera settings.

#19 Capture images that may interest the event organizers

Often times festivals or events are looking for images to use for next year’s promotional material. Depending on the event’s budget, some might even offer to pay for desirable images, while others may not be able to offer more than a byline (it’s still very cool to see your images published). Many events hold a photo contest that pays prize money and features the winning image in promotional material. You should give such an opportunity your best shot.

Shoot images that might interest event organizers, such as this image from the Ohio River Sternwheel Festival held in Marietta, Ohio.

Shoot images that might interest event organizers, such as this image from the Ohio River Sternwheel Festival held in Marietta, Ohio.

#20 Give your photos a vintage effect in post-production

Giving your image a nice sepia tone to match the photos of former eras can be an interesting way to present reenactment or old-time feeling events.  Click on this link to download an American Civil War Lightroom preset. This preset will give you the era’s sepia tone effect, with faded corners and added grain.

DSC_9684_rto

Remember to have fun when you are photographing events and festivals. It is easy to get so involved with getting that perfect shot that you don’t take the time to enjoy the experience. Please share some of your favorite reenactment or festival shots.

The post 20 Tips for Photographing Historical Reenactments and Festivals by Bruce Wunderlich appeared first on Digital Photography School.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/nuit-blanche-calgary-2014/Nuit Blanche Calgary 2014Last night was Nuit Blanche 2014 in Calgary, and the area surrounding Olympic Plaza was transformed into a venue hosting numerous contemporary/ performance art pieces.  Unlike many Nuit Blanche events around the world that run until dawn, the Calgary version ended at 1am, due to some overly stringent noise bylaws.  Our festival is a relative newcomer, and it showed, as the performance pieces were hit and miss, and organizational logistics weren’t well thought out (the popular “All Night Breakfast” pieces were set inside a tiny cramped space, while a far less engaging piece was granted the main lobby of City Hall).  But the hits were definite hits, and it was fun, well attended, and has huge potential for growth and improvement.  Looking forward to next year. 
Fitting caption, as the bottom arrow points to my Revolution Brewing shirt (from a craft Chicago brewery of that moniker).
The actual Pennies from Heaven performance featured a lady up on a ladder tossing/ dropping popcorn into the mouths of passersby underneath.  Fun!
I was handed this protest placard.  The back side read ‘I will not be SHAMED for my sexuality”

This interactive exhibit was part of the All Night Breakfast, where you were given a small placard, and then you could spell out whatever message you wanted in Alphaghetti letters.
This was what I came up with.  I like the happy colourful feel of the piece, contrasted against the political call to action.
The Symphony for Absent Wildlife


Limelight – a spotlit area on Stephen Ave, inviting any brave enough to bask in the limelight for a moment, sharing with all any talent or spontaneous performance one fancied.
20,000 Snowdrops.  Anita grabbed one of the 20,000 Snowdrop bulbs handed out – a flower to be planted in the fall, and expected to bloom at the end of winter.  By giving away this many bulbs, the hope is that the city will be awash in snowdrops next year.Alright, it’s time for bed.  Gonna take in a flick for the Calgary film fest in a couple hours.  It’s a great weekend for arts and culture in Calgary.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/nuit-blanche-calgary-2014/

Nuit Blanche Calgary 2014

Last night was Nuit Blanche 2014 in Calgary, and the area surrounding Olympic Plaza was transformed into a venue hosting numerous contemporary/ performance art pieces. Unlike many Nuit Blanche events around the world that run until dawn, the Calgary version ended at 1am, due to some overly stringent noise bylaws. Our festival is a relative newcomer, and it showed, as the performance pieces were hit and miss, and organizational logistics weren’t well thought out (the popular “All Night Breakfast” pieces were set inside a tiny cramped space, while a far less engaging piece was granted the main lobby of City Hall). But the hits were definite hits, and it was fun, well attended, and has huge potential for growth and improvement. Looking forward to next year.

Nuit Blanche Calgary-1
Fitting caption, as the bottom arrow points to my Revolution Brewing shirt (from a craft Chicago brewery of that moniker).

Nuit Blanche Calgary-2
The actual Pennies from Heaven performance featured a lady up on a ladder tossing/ dropping popcorn into the mouths of passersby underneath. Fun!

Nuit Blanche Calgary-3
I was handed this protest placard. The back side read ‘I will not be SHAMED for my sexuality”

Nuit Blanche Calgary-4

Nuit Blanche Calgary-8
This interactive exhibit was part of the All Night Breakfast, where you were given a small placard, and then you could spell out whatever message you wanted in Alphaghetti letters.

Nuit Blanche Calgary-7
This was what I came up with. I like the happy colourful feel of the piece, contrasted against the political call to action.

Nuit Blanche Calgary
The Symphony for Absent Wildlife

Nuit Blanche Calgary-9

Nuit Blanche Calgary-6

Nuit Blanche Calgary-13
Limelight – a spotlit area on Stephen Ave, inviting any brave enough to bask in the limelight for a moment, sharing with all any talent or spontaneous performance one fancied.

Nuit Blanche Calgary-12
20,000 Snowdrops. Anita grabbed one of the 20,000 Snowdrop bulbs handed out – a flower to be planted in the fall, and expected to bloom at the end of winter. By giving away this many bulbs, the hope is that the city will be awash in snowdrops next year.


Alright, it’s time for bed. Gonna take in a flick for the Calgary film fest in a couple hours. It’s a great weekend for arts and culture in Calgary.
New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/georges-creek/George’s Creek  I am linking up with   Mosaic Monday and Our World Tuesday 
Hello, everyone.. Fall is almost here ( starts tomorrow the 22nd)  and I just can not believe how fast the summer went.. We had a cool summer here, not the usual hot & humid days that we are used to.. LOL, I feel cheated..
These are some photos from our weekend walk at our local George’s Creek.. it is a creek that leads into our Prettyboy reservoir.. Hubby and I have enjoyed our walks along the creek each time seeing something different..

These are some of the scenes from our walk..the pretty Swallowtail and Fritillary butterflies. Some wildflowers and ferns seen along the creek.

Swallowtail and Fritallary butterflies..

 I am not sure what these little orange flowers are called but, it was obvious the Ruby-throated Hummingbird was enjoying their nectar. 

 A sweet hummer, I will miss them when they head south.. I wish I could go with them.  I am not looking forward to this winter.. 

 Some slider turtles sunning themselves on a log, an Eastern Box Turtle, wildflowers, Fritillary Butterfly and a Canada Goose.
I hope you enjoyed these nature scenes and photos.  I am glad you came along on our walk.. 
As always I thank you in advance for stopping by and for the nice comments.
I hope you can join in on our at  Mosaic Monday and   Our World Tuesday
 Thanks to Judith our new host of Mosaic Monday and to the  hosting group of Our World Tuesday: Arija, Gattina, Lady Fi, Sylvia,  Sandy and Jennifer.  I wish everyone a happy week ahead!

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/georges-creek/

George’s Creek

  I am linking up with   Mosaic Monday and Our World Tuesday 

Hello, everyone.. Fall is almost here ( starts tomorrow the 22nd)  and I just can not believe how fast the summer went.. We had a cool summer here, not the usual hot & humid days that we are used to.. LOL, I feel cheated..

These are some photos from our weekend walk at our local George’s Creek.. it is a creek that leads into our Prettyboy reservoir.. Hubby and I have enjoyed our walks along the creek each time seeing something different..

These are some of the scenes from our walk..the pretty Swallowtail and Fritillary butterflies. Some wildflowers and ferns seen along the creek.

Swallowtail and Fritallary butterflies..

 I am not sure what these little orange flowers are called but, it was obvious the Ruby-throated Hummingbird was enjoying their nectar.

 A sweet hummer, I will miss them when they head south.. I wish I could go with them.  I am not looking forward to this winter..

 Some slider turtles sunning themselves on a log, an Eastern Box Turtle, wildflowers, Fritillary Butterfly and a Canada Goose.

I hope you enjoyed these nature scenes and photos.  I am glad you came along on our walk..

As always I thank you in advance for stopping by and for the nice comments.

I hope you can join in on our at  Mosaic Monday and   Our World Tuesday

 Thanks to Judith our new host of Mosaic Monday and to the hosting group of Our World Tuesday: Arija, Gattina, Lady Fi, Sylvia, Sandy and Jennifer.  I wish everyone a happy week ahead!

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/ah-sundays-doggies-end-the-weekend-with-a-laugh/Ah!! Sundays Doggies!! End the Weekend With a Laugh!!






 
Hope you enjoy some giggles and grins from these guys!!  Have a lovely Sunday!!

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/ah-sundays-doggies-end-the-weekend-with-a-laugh/

Ah!! Sundays Doggies!! End the Weekend With a Laugh!!

Hope you enjoy some giggles and grins from these guys!!  Have a lovely Sunday!!
New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/tips-from-a-landscape-photographer/Tips From a Landscape PhotographerB&H Photo Video is a huge mega camera store in New York City, but they also have a great selection of helpful videos. In this video Robert Rodriguez Jr. gives you some tips and insight into what it’s like to be a landscape photographer.
Capturing something that means something to you
Capturing emotion in photos is the essence of being creative
Compositions with layers to add depth
Why going back to one place again and again can help you take better photos of it
 The 4 a.m. filter
Printing your work, making it tangible

“Before you can think out of the box, you have to start with a box” - Twyla Tharp, The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It for Life

How will you get outside your box and be more creative?
Check out Living Landscapes and also Loving Landscapes, two dPS eBooks on this subject!
The post Tips From a Landscape Photographer by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/tips-from-a-landscape-photographer/

Tips From a Landscape Photographer

B&H Photo Video is a huge mega camera store in New York City, but they also have a great selection of helpful videos. In this video Robert Rodriguez Jr. gives you some tips and insight into what it’s like to be a landscape photographer.

  • Capturing something that means something to you
  • Capturing emotion in photos is the essence of being creative
  • Compositions with layers to add depth
  • Why going back to one place again and again can help you take better photos of it
  •  The 4 a.m. filter
  • Printing your work, making it tangible

“Before you can think out of the box, you have to start with a box” - Twyla TharpThe Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It for Life

How will you get outside your box and be more creative?

Check out Living Landscapes and also Loving Landscapes, two dPS eBooks on this subject!

The post Tips From a Landscape Photographer by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/in-the-south-part-33-the-river-trebizat-and-lunch/In the South [Part 3/3]: The River Trebizat and Lunch
We finish off our journey to the south on the river Trebizat. Trebizat is 51 km (30 miles) long and is the second largest losing stream in Bosnia  and Herzegovina that drains into the underground and reappears several  times. In terms of length, it comes right after the Trebišnjica river  which is the largest river of this kind in the world and also a  tributary of the Neretva watershed.
We also had lunch on the river in the Restaurant/Motel called “Most”, which translated means “Bridge”. The lunch was excellent, but we had to wait some time, before our order arived, since the place was jam packed.
This gave me some time to explore the surroundings. Enjoy!
This is a multi-part series, other parts include:Part One: Mogorjelo, the Roman country housePart Two: The Kravice WaterfallsPart Three: The River Trebizat and Lunch
click on the images for a bigger view



The Trebizat river is the only underground river in Europe which sinks  into the ground and emerges again a total of 9 times. This is a river  with nine names, full of travertines, with amazing landscapes and a  meandering stream, which waters the surrounding fertile fields.



 A sign, letting the drivers know, that they are crossing the river Trebizat.





While the others waited for lunch, I took a walk around the motel to see what I could find. 


There is a nice park area here. 





Another small restaurant is located here, and it belongs to the one we were visiting. This one here is not currently used. 






 This river flows through an area of remarkable ecological value, hosting protected areas such as the travertine-formation around Kravice Waterfall.



You can even freshen yourself up on the cold river stream. 


It was time to head back for lunch. 


Everything was delicious. 




We payed our bill and headed back home. It was a wonderful day spent in the south.

The End 

Linking to: Weekly Top Shot, Shadow Shot Sunday, Weekend Reflections, 

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/in-the-south-part-33-the-river-trebizat-and-lunch/

In the South [Part 3/3]: The River Trebizat and Lunch

We finish off our journey to the south on the river Trebizat. Trebizat is 51 km (30 miles) long and is the second largest losing stream in Bosnia and Herzegovina that drains into the underground and reappears several times. In terms of length, it comes right after the Trebišnjica river which is the largest river of this kind in the world and also a tributary of the Neretva watershed.

We also had lunch on the river in the Restaurant/Motel called “Most”, which translated means “Bridge”. The lunch was excellent, but we had to wait some time, before our order arived, since the place was jam packed.

This gave me some time to explore the surroundings. Enjoy!

This is a multi-part series, other parts include:
Part One: Mogorjelo, the Roman country house
Part Two: The Kravice Waterfalls
Part Three: The River Trebizat and Lunch

click on the images for a bigger view

The Trebizat river is the only underground river in Europe which sinks into the ground and emerges again a total of 9 times. This is a river with nine names, full of travertines, with amazing landscapes and a meandering stream, which waters the surrounding fertile fields.

 A sign, letting the drivers know, that they are crossing the river Trebizat.

While the others waited for lunch, I took a walk around the motel to see what I could find.

There is a nice park area here.

Another small restaurant is located here, and it belongs to the one we were visiting. This one here is not currently used.

 This river flows through an area of remarkable ecological value, hosting protected areas such as the travertine-formation around Kravice Waterfall.

You can even freshen yourself up on the cold river stream.

It was time to head back for lunch.

Everything was delicious.

We payed our bill and headed back home. It was a wonderful day spent in the south.
The End
New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/looking-for-me/Looking for me ? ..I went to Southport Air Show yesterday! It was a murky, misty day but the organisers did a good job of making sure the ‘show went on’. One of the highlights was, as always, The Red Arrows, and the whole of the impressive – and, indeed, impressed – audience gasped and swooned as the pilots did their stuff. All except this woman! She missed the lot! Must have been the only

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/09/looking-for-me/

Looking for me ? ..

I went to Southport Air Show yesterday! It was a murky, misty day but the organisers did a good job of making sure the ‘show went on’. One of the highlights was, as always, The Red Arrows, and the whole of the impressive – and, indeed, impressed – audience gasped and swooned as the pilots did their stuff. All except this woman! She missed the lot! Must have been the only