Dhyan Chand birthday special – 10 interesting facts about India’s legendary …

Dhyan Chand birthday special – 10 interesting facts about India”s legendary …

Arguably one of world”s best hockey players ever, Dhyan Chand”s life had some interesting stories. We bring to you, some interesting facts about his life. Have a read and check how well do you know the legendary Indian. 1) In honour of arguably the …
Read more on India.com

Star Cast: Emraan Hashmi, Humaima Mallick, Kay Kay, Paresh Rawal, Deepak …

Don”t get me wrong, this isn”t the worst film you”ll see this year, but it is an interesting story told predictably. Just consider the plot: Tired of fleecing unsuspecting folks out of a few thousand rupees, petty conman Raja (Hashmi) sets his sights …
Read more on IBNLive

http://dlvr.it/6mZQdf

The top five players linked with signing for Arsenal this week - Falcao, Cerci …

The top five players linked with signing for Arsenal this week – Falcao, Cerci …

There has been plenty of talk this week that Arsene Wenger will move for players late in the transfer window. The Gunners could still arguably use a new centre forward and a holding midfielder and they showed last year that they don”t mind doing …
Read more on HITC

Spanish striker endured a torrid three-and-a-half year spell at Chelsea

The announcement of his loan move to AC Milan finally ends a three-and-a-half year spell of personal hell for Fernando Torres. The £50million centre forward arrived from Liverpool on deadline day in January 2011 and every season since has seen the …
Read more on Daily Mail

New Jersey”s top five defensive lineman for the 2014 season

1-Rashan Gary, Paramus Catholic Jr., 6-5, 285 pounds. Undecided, No. 4. The top-ranked recruit nationally for the class of 2016 recorded 58 tackles, 13 of which went for loss, two sacks and forced four fumbles as a nose guard for Scotch Plains in 2013.
Read more on NJ.com

http://dlvr.it/6mYgQy

Top Knobs TK500BLK Reviews

Top Knobs TK500BLK

* Top Knobs offers thousands of high quality knobs, pulls, and bath accessories in a variety of styles.

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New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/08/blog-style-change/Blog Style ChangeFor about a year I have used the “dynamic views” available as part of the blogger platform, but switched back to one of the older templates for what I consider an important reason. Why? Dynamic views does not support the use of what are called lightboxes, which in simple terms is the ability to have the images pop up in a box within the same browser window. That means there is no need to open a image in a new tab or window to view at a larger size. Being an image centric blog that is a big deal to me. While the method of opening an image in a new window works, I don’t like the process myself. In addition the dynamic views limits the ability to break up a post, so that larger posts don’t fill up the main page. As a result of those two issues with dynamic views I switched back to the older format.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/08/blog-style-change/

Blog Style Change

For about a year I have used the “dynamic views” available as part of the blogger platform, but switched back to one of the older templates for what I consider an important reason. Why? Dynamic views does not support the use of what are called lightboxes, which in simple terms is the ability to have the images pop up in a box within the same browser window. That means there is no need to open a image in a new tab or window to view at a larger size. Being an image centric blog that is a big deal to me. While the method of opening an image in a new window works, I don’t like the process myself. In addition the dynamic views limits the ability to break up a post, so that larger posts don’t fill up the main page. As a result of those two issues with dynamic views I switched back to the older format.

Lastest Cool News

Cool stuff to distract (or save) a pet

I”M ALWAYS on the lookout for great new products that can make life with pets easier and better. When I find them, I want to share them with you, and I ran across some doozies in July at SuperZoo, a pet retailer trade show in Las Vegas. I asked some of …
Read more on Philly.com

Cool Springs building fires deemed suspicious

A Cool Springs apartment complex under construction was set on fire twice early Thursday morning, according to a Franklin fire marshal. One person was injured after both of the fires were set at Crescent Cool Springs Apartments complex, according to a …
Read more on The Tennessean

Cool creator: Guy”s beach cooler raises M on Kickstarter

On the show Cool creator: Guy”s beach cooler raises $ 11M on Kickstarter · credit-cards Don”t miss these hidden credit card rewards · Consumer Is “free” money to open a checking account worth it? On the show Labor Day could be the busiest travel weekend …
Read more on Today.com

http://dlvr.it/6mXF2R

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/08/northern-convergence-the-sea-to-the-sky-highway-in-british-columbia-the-sky-wins/Northern Convergence: The Sea to the Sky Highway in British Columbia (the Sky wins)
Porteau Cove Provincial Park
We are continuing our “Northern Convergence” journey through Canada and the Pacific Northwest. Our last post saw us observing the geology in and around Vancouver Island and Goldstream Provincial Park, and having a look at the story poles (totem poles) of the First Nations people. That evening we caught the ferry to North Vancouver. The new day would see us heading into the mainland interior along the Sea to the Sky Highway to Whistler, British Columbia. Of all the our planned tours, this was the day I anticipated the most.
It’s funny sometimes how perfect the weather is in promotional  materials. No matter the climate, pictures of tourist destinations are  always bathed in sunlight. It’s clear that the most important item on  the luggage list is sunscreen. Oh, that it were like that in real life!
The  problem with a field studies class in a foreign country is that the  schedule is very rigid. Reservations have to be made months in advance,  and though we might try to schedule for times when the weather might be  the best, there is just no way to know. Much of the region is  technically a rainforest. It rains (and snows). Your best bet is always flexibility. Stay in one place for a week, Vancouver, say, and wait for the sunny days. They have great museums in the area for those gloomy ones. We didn’t have that luxury, unfortunately.
Porteau Cove Provincial Park
The day’s route, the Sea to the Sky Highway, follows Canada’s Highway 99 from Vancouver through Howe Sound to the mountain towns of Whistler and Pemberton. We were traversing the Coastal Belt, a geologic province that shows the effects of convergence, both in the past, and ongoing today.
The Cascadia Subduction Zone has been plunging beneath the western edge of North America for tens of millions of years. The sinking slab is heated, and parts of it (under the influence of water in the rock and sediments) melts, forming plutons of magma. The molten rock is buoyant and rises through the crust, sometimes reaching the surface as volcanic eruptions, but much of it remains at depth, cooling slowly to form granitic rock. Uplift and erosion has exposed the deep-forming rocks at the surface.
Porteau Cove Provincial Park
The highway hugs the base of the cliffs on the south side of Howe Sound, a deep glacial fjord, one of the southernmost on the Pacific coast of North America. The weather, true to the predictions, was overcast and rainy. There was some hope that it might clear later in the day. Since we couldn’t look upwards, we concentrated on the rocks in front of us. We made our first stop at Porteau Cove Provincial Park, one of the few accessible shorelines along the steep walls of Howe Sound.

The park is popular with divers, but there is plenty to see in the rocks and on the shoreline as well. Across the highway we could see exfoliating sheets of granitic rock, which in most other places are covered with thick vegetation. We didn’t have to beat on any rocks to see the minerals because the railroad hugs the cliff here as well, and they used granitic rock for the track bed. The phenomenon of exfoliation is a problem in this area. Because the breaks slope towards the shoreline, rockfalls are a constant hazard, and the highway is sometimes disrupted. Porteau Cove actually has an emergency ferry terminal for when the highway is blocked. 
The cove and beach exists in part because there is a large recessional moraine hidden within the waters of Howe Sound, and Porteau Cove is part of its southern margin. As the ice age was ending, debris formed a ridge around the end of the glacier when it briefly stabilized.

It was a quiet morning, and few people were hanging about. We took our time, hoping for a bit of the storm to clear. No dice. We headed up the highway towards our next stop, Shannon Falls Provincial Park. Along the way we passed the Britannia copper mine, long shut down, but now hosting a mineral and mining museum. The mine produced around $  1.3 billion of copper and was the largest such mine in the British Empire. Shortly afterwards we arrived at Shannon Falls. Was there something up there in the mist? The clouds were playing a tantalizing game with us.

Shannon Falls are the third highest in British Columbia at 335 meters (1,105 feet). They are a fine example of a hanging valley, caused when the main Squamish glacier cut the very deep Howe Sound while the smaller glacier on Shannon Creek could not keep up. When the ice receded, the valley floor entered Howe Sound at a high elevation, so a waterfall resulted. Along the short trail to the falls overlook we could see a boulder with glacial striations.

Then the clouds parted and we got to have a view of the waterfalls! They were spectacular. They didn’t fall over a single cliff, and instead rolled over a series of high ledges. 

From the lower viewpoint, the whitewater seemed to be everywhere…

The clouds continued to lift and we finally had a view of the flank of Stawamus Chief, a 700 meter high dome of granitic rock. Although partly shaped by glacial ice, the dome shape results as much from exfoliation of the corners and edges of the granite monolith.

The clearing conditions ignited a spark of hope that we might see the big volcanoes among the high ridges above, Mt. Garibaldi and Black Tusk. As we reached the end of Howe Sound and started ascending the valley, those hopes were dashed. The cloud deck was impenetrable. Our remaining stops on the Sea to the Sky would need to be of the up-close variety.

Our next stop was Brandywine Falls Provincial Park. The rocks took a decidedly different appearance. Hidden in the clouds were two volcanoes, Garibaldi and Black Tusk, and volcanic flows covered exposures of the granitic rocks. A series of lava flows covered the path of Brandywine Creek. The slopes along the creek were covered with hexagonal chunks of basaltic lava broken from the low cliffs above us. The lava flow had cooled and contracted into a large number of columnar joints.

The lava flows followed a sinuous path along a former river drainage, forming what we would call an inverted stream, but which the park info described as a volcanic esker (eskers are stream deposits from rivers that flowed on or through glaciers). The flows are only a few tens of thousands of years old.

And then we broke out of the forest and found ourselves looking at marvelous Brandywine Falls. At 70 meters (230 feet), they make a single drop off the edge of the lava. Brandywine Falls formed in a different manner than Shannon. The top layer of basalt is more resistant than the others, so the underlying rocks are constantly being eroded and carried away. The lip of the waterfall is moving slowly upstream in an example of headward erosion.

After observing the falls and lava flows we headed into Whistler for lunch. It was unexpectedly crowded, and we soon realized we had stumbled upon preparations for an ironman triathlon. We scattered through the village, and were quickly reminded that Whistler was once a venue for the 2010 Winter Olympics. We had miles to go, and soon hit the road. As we made our way east through Pemberton and beyond, the clouds cleared and we were bathed in sunshine. We had reached the rain shadow of the Coastal Ranges.

We missed some things, but I had to count ourselves lucky for seeing two thirds of our scheduled sights. Yet I couldn’t help being a bit disappointed at missing the big volcanoes. It doesn’t take long to find what the sights are like on the internet, so I’ve including a few of them below.
I have to give credit where credit is due. This video shows more of the scenery than we saw on our way to Whistler, but it also shows rain and cloudy skies!
These scenes are mostly courtesy of Destination British Columbia (and no, I don’t blame them for putting their best foot forward! The scenery is truly spectacular.).

 Below is Howe Sound and Highway 99 on a cloudless day.

The Black Tusk is the deeply eroded remnant of a volcanic cone. It is a former stratovolcano between and 1.3 and 1.1 million years old. A late eruption about 170,000 years ago formed the dark cone at the summit.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Black_Tusk
The peak of Mount Garibaldi is one of the more interesting of the Cascades volcanoes (and one of the northernmost). It began erupting dacite (silica-rich) lavas about 250,000 years ago. The most recent activity was around 8,000 years ago, so it has to be considered potentially active. The volcano erupted in part on an active glacier, and when the ice ages ended, a large portion of the volcano fell away into the Cheekye Valley.

I’ve got to get to this region in clear weather one day! 
There is an excellent guide to the Sea to the Sky Highway available online:
Turner, B; Kelman, M; Ulmi, M; Turner, T., Sea to Sky GeoTour, geology and landscapes along Highway 99 from Vancouver to Whistler, British Columbia, Geological Survey of Canada, Miscellaneous G 377E

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/08/northern-convergence-the-sea-to-the-sky-highway-in-british-columbia-the-sky-wins/

Northern Convergence: The Sea to the Sky Highway in British Columbia (the Sky wins)

Porteau Cove Provincial Park

We are continuing our “Northern Convergence” journey through Canada and the Pacific Northwest. Our last post saw us observing the geology in and around Vancouver Island and Goldstream Provincial Park, and having a look at the story poles (totem poles) of the First Nations people. That evening we caught the ferry to North Vancouver. The new day would see us heading into the mainland interior along the Sea to the Sky Highway to Whistler, British Columbia. Of all the our planned tours, this was the day I anticipated the most.

It’s funny sometimes how perfect the weather is in promotional materials. No matter the climate, pictures of tourist destinations are always bathed in sunlight. It’s clear that the most important item on the luggage list is sunscreen. Oh, that it were like that in real life!

The problem with a field studies class in a foreign country is that the schedule is very rigid. Reservations have to be made months in advance, and though we might try to schedule for times when the weather might be the best, there is just no way to know. Much of the region is technically a rainforest. It rains (and snows). Your best bet is always flexibility. Stay in one place for a week, Vancouver, say, and wait for the sunny days. They have great museums in the area for those gloomy ones. We didn’t have that luxury, unfortunately.

Porteau Cove Provincial Park

The day’s route, the Sea to the Sky Highway, follows Canada’s Highway 99 from Vancouver through Howe Sound to the mountain towns of Whistler and Pemberton. We were traversing the Coastal Belt, a geologic province that shows the effects of convergence, both in the past, and ongoing today.

The Cascadia Subduction Zone has been plunging beneath the western edge of North America for tens of millions of years. The sinking slab is heated, and parts of it (under the influence of water in the rock and sediments) melts, forming plutons of magma. The molten rock is buoyant and rises through the crust, sometimes reaching the surface as volcanic eruptions, but much of it remains at depth, cooling slowly to form granitic rock. Uplift and erosion has exposed the deep-forming rocks at the surface.

Porteau Cove Provincial Park

The highway hugs the base of the cliffs on the south side of Howe Sound, a deep glacial fjord, one of the southernmost on the Pacific coast of North America. The weather, true to the predictions, was overcast and rainy. There was some hope that it might clear later in the day. Since we couldn’t look upwards, we concentrated on the rocks in front of us. We made our first stop at Porteau Cove Provincial Park, one of the few accessible shorelines along the steep walls of Howe Sound.

The park is popular with divers, but there is plenty to see in the rocks and on the shoreline as well. Across the highway we could see exfoliating sheets of granitic rock, which in most other places are covered with thick vegetation. We didn’t have to beat on any rocks to see the minerals because the railroad hugs the cliff here as well, and they used granitic rock for the track bed. The phenomenon of exfoliation is a problem in this area. Because the breaks slope towards the shoreline, rockfalls are a constant hazard, and the highway is sometimes disrupted. Porteau Cove actually has an emergency ferry terminal for when the highway is blocked. 

The cove and beach exists in part because there is a large recessional moraine hidden within the waters of Howe Sound, and Porteau Cove is part of its southern margin. As the ice age was ending, debris formed a ridge around the end of the glacier when it briefly stabilized.

It was a quiet morning, and few people were hanging about. We took our time, hoping for a bit of the storm to clear. No dice. We headed up the highway towards our next stop, Shannon Falls Provincial Park. Along the way we passed the Britannia copper mine, long shut down, but now hosting a mineral and mining museum. The mine produced around $ 1.3 billion of copper and was the largest such mine in the British Empire. Shortly afterwards we arrived at Shannon Falls. Was there something up there in the mist? The clouds were playing a tantalizing game with us.

Shannon Falls are the third highest in British Columbia at 335 meters (1,105 feet). They are a fine example of a hanging valley, caused when the main Squamish glacier cut the very deep Howe Sound while the smaller glacier on Shannon Creek could not keep up. When the ice receded, the valley floor entered Howe Sound at a high elevation, so a waterfall resulted. Along the short trail to the falls overlook we could see a boulder with glacial striations.

Then the clouds parted and we got to have a view of the waterfalls! They were spectacular. They didn’t fall over a single cliff, and instead rolled over a series of high ledges.

From the lower viewpoint, the whitewater seemed to be everywhere…

The clouds continued to lift and we finally had a view of the flank of Stawamus Chief, a 700 meter high dome of granitic rock. Although partly shaped by glacial ice, the dome shape results as much from exfoliation of the corners and edges of the granite monolith.

The clearing conditions ignited a spark of hope that we might see the big volcanoes among the high ridges above, Mt. Garibaldi and Black Tusk. As we reached the end of Howe Sound and started ascending the valley, those hopes were dashed. The cloud deck was impenetrable. Our remaining stops on the Sea to the Sky would need to be of the up-close variety.

Our next stop was Brandywine Falls Provincial Park. The rocks took a decidedly different appearance. Hidden in the clouds were two volcanoes, Garibaldi and Black Tusk, and volcanic flows covered exposures of the granitic rocks. A series of lava flows covered the path of Brandywine Creek. The slopes along the creek were covered with hexagonal chunks of basaltic lava broken from the low cliffs above us. The lava flow had cooled and contracted into a large number of columnar joints.

The lava flows followed a sinuous path along a former river drainage, forming what we would call an inverted stream, but which the park info described as a volcanic esker (eskers are stream deposits from rivers that flowed on or through glaciers). The flows are only a few tens of thousands of years old.

And then we broke out of the forest and found ourselves looking at marvelous Brandywine Falls. At 70 meters (230 feet), they make a single drop off the edge of the lava. Brandywine Falls formed in a different manner than Shannon. The top layer of basalt is more resistant than the others, so the underlying rocks are constantly being eroded and carried away. The lip of the waterfall is moving slowly upstream in an example of headward erosion.

After observing the falls and lava flows we headed into Whistler for lunch. It was unexpectedly crowded, and we soon realized we had stumbled upon preparations for an ironman triathlon. We scattered through the village, and were quickly reminded that Whistler was once a venue for the 2010 Winter Olympics. We had miles to go, and soon hit the road. As we made our way east through Pemberton and beyond, the clouds cleared and we were bathed in sunshine. We had reached the rain shadow of the Coastal Ranges.

We missed some things, but I had to count ourselves lucky for seeing two thirds of our scheduled sights. Yet I couldn’t help being a bit disappointed at missing the big volcanoes. It doesn’t take long to find what the sights are like on the internet, so I’ve including a few of them below.

I have to give credit where credit is due. This video shows more of the scenery than we saw on our way to Whistler, but it also shows rain and cloudy skies!

These scenes are mostly courtesy of Destination British Columbia (and no, I don’t blame them for putting their best foot forward! The scenery is truly spectacular.).

 Below is Howe Sound and Highway 99 on a cloudless day.

The Black Tusk is the deeply eroded remnant of a volcanic cone. It is a former stratovolcano between and 1.3 and 1.1 million years old. A late eruption about 170,000 years ago formed the dark cone at the summit.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Black_Tusk

The peak of Mount Garibaldi is one of the more interesting of the Cascades volcanoes (and one of the northernmost). It began erupting dacite (silica-rich) lavas about 250,000 years ago. The most recent activity was around 8,000 years ago, so it has to be considered potentially active. The volcano erupted in part on an active glacier, and when the ice ages ended, a large portion of the volcano fell away into the Cheekye Valley.

I’ve got to get to this region in clear weather one day!

There is an excellent guide to the Sea to the Sky Highway available online:

Turner, B; Kelman, M; Ulmi, M; Turner, T., Sea to Sky GeoTour, geology and landscapes along Highway 99 from Vancouver to Whistler, British Columbia, Geological Survey of Canada, Miscellaneous G 377E

24 Incredible Acts of Kindness

Here are just some of many incredible acts of kindness that can change someones day. Visit our site: http://TopTrending.com Like us on Facebook: https://www….
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Poker players Connor Drinan and Cary Katz go all in pre-flop with aces at the World Series of Poker million buy-in tournament.
Video Rating: 4 / 5  http://dlvr.it/6mWZPM

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/08/checking-in-on-the-whole-noise-bug-a-boo-theater-style-and-some-thoughts-about-current-digital-offerings/Checking in on the whole noise bug-a-boo. Theater style. And some thoughts about current digital offerings.

Legendary Austin actor, Jaston Williams on stage at Zach Theatre.

My wonderful friends in the marketing department at Zach Theatre asked me to come and photograph  a dress rehearsal of Jaston Williams’s one man play, Maid Marian and the Stolen Car. I packed up a little bag of toys and headed over on Tues. evening. I shot primarily with two cameras and two lenses. I was sporting the Nikon D7100 camera with the 18-140mm zoom and the Olympus EM-5 (in its natty black finish…) with the 25mm f1.4 Pana/Leica lens. 

The slow zoom pushed me to shoot at 6400 ISO while the much more functional 25mm f1.4 allowed me to stick around ISO 800 with an f-stop around f2.5.

What’s my takeaway? While the D7100 is very usable for this kind of work at ISO 6400 the quickly changing light is murder on exposure consistency and the slower feedback loop of shoot/chimp/correct/shoot/chimp/re-correct means far more missed shots than when I use a camera with a good EVF. The feedback loop goes something like: view/correct/shoot/shoot/shoot. 




Yes, the finder on the Nikon is pretty and the sensor is big and gorgeous but I’ll trade all that any day for nimble, accurate and fun-to-hold-and-shoot. Yes, we could have used faster lenses on the Nikon but that would have only changed the ISO I ended up setting, not the iterative nature of shooting with a (finely made ) last century paradigm. 

Looking forward here’s what I see in camera marketing: The camera company that is most successful with professionals and advanced enthusiasts in the future will be the forward thinking company that incorporates a great APS-C sensor; a wonderful EVF that cuts down on the iteration-chain for more effective, almost intuitive, shooting, great lenses that work well wide open and good video. 

The Olympus system is almost there with the OMD EM-1 but it remains to be seen whether or not they can sustain profitability in the market long enough to continue consumer camera operations. The marketing hurdle with regards to the masses is always going to be the sensor size. It’s too bad they haven’t found a marketer/advertising agency who can succinctly and movingly explain the inherent advantages of the smaller format. ( I volunteer to give it a whirl. I couldn’t do worse….).

Panasonic is in a similar boat but they’ve made a conscious decision (I think) to cut all the consumer crap out of their line and focus on the higher end products that we enjoy. The GH4 is 95% of the way there. A bit more work on the Jpeg processing and the EVF quality and they have a good shot of staying in the marketplace and adding market share.

Nikon had a good idea with the V system but destroyed whatever advantages they had when they screwed around with the formula and went gunning for rank consumer markets instead of forward thinking pros and competent amateurs. For Nikon to truly compete going forward they desperately need to create a camera with a sensor as good as the one in the D7100 but with a mirror less configuration that features a wonderful EVF and lightning fast response.  Screw the idea of making a faux rangefinder. It’s not the size that matters to most shooters, it’s the tight feedback loop of full information we get in the EVF finders!
They have to get that figured out. If they do they can introduce cameras like the D810, the D610 and the D7100 but with brilliant EVFs instead of last century optical finders. Keep the same kinds of lenses, keep the big, hearty bodies. Fix the damn feedback loop! Oly shooters come for the size (supposedly) but they stay because of the finders. Make the finders nearly universal and a major advantage of m4:3 goes by the wayside.

I think Nikon will finally get it because they have little to fall back upon. It’s morph or die. It’s adapt or shrink into irrelevance. If they want to hedge their bets they can keep a few OVFs in the pipeline during the inevitable transition. That will make the traditionalists (over 50′s) happier.  But if they want to provide cameras for the post digital age they need to figure out that once we have almost automatic visual feedback and control we’re never, ever going back. And that includes people like Michael Reichmann who only a few years ago pissed on EVFs as not viable. Now he’s dumped all his Nikon stuff for a Sony A7r system—- partially because of the size difference but, in my opinion, his brain finally accepted the idea that seeing the final image before you pushed the button was——revolutionary, not evolutionary.




Good luck to you, Nikon. I hope you see the light and I hope it’s coming through a small, wonderful eye level screen instead of dead glass….

But onward to everyone’s current “golden boy”, Canon. The mantra is that they will survive because they’ve got the momentum. They’ll keep making the traditional DSLR cameras because they own so much of the market. And the other line I always hear is, “They have the resources to compete in mirror less any time they want.”  I maintain that they may of the resources but they lack the will and the foresight or the EOS-M would never have been such a cynically terrible camera. Deep down I’m starting to believe that they are the Japanese Kodak and they are so sure of their internal research and direction that they don’t see the bullet train heading toward them on the same track.

The sad thing for all these guys is that the entire market is changing. Cameras in general are going away. They are being incorporated into all kinds of other products. They are being relentlessly de-valued by smart phones and combo computer products like tablets. If I ran Canon right now I’d jump in and start eating my own babies by making a line of incredible mirror less cameras in the full frame and APS-C spaces that required all new lenses and all new attachments and were the first line to implement the new generation of sensors that we’ve heard is coming down the line.  And just wait until Apple successfully incorporates a great camera into a beautiful wrist watch that automatically loads the images to your iPhone….

My advice to Canon? Make a mirror free product that’s demonstrably better than any mirror less product out there. Three models: good, better, best. Launch with a full line of lenses: extremely wide zooms, fast primes and small but high performing long zooms. And toss the lion’s share of marketing into their promotion. They can “halo” the existing products. They can cannibalize sales from all the competitors. Canon has the overwhelming share of name recognition. They have the deep pockets. If they don’t follow through I’ll be waiting for their Kodak moment with their camera division. 

But wait. Isn’t there already a company out there that hits all the main criteria I’ve been pounding away at? Yep. And it’s the only company whose recent products I haven’t used. It’s Fuji. And it’s just right now that they got all their shit together in a meaningful way with the XT-1. Previous to that they had their share of software and firmware issues, zany non-compatible raw file issues, slow focusing issues and even the idiocy of launching a flagship product (the X Pro-1) without an adjustable diopter on the finder. A small point for most but they are still behind on the video front…

But to their credit they’ve kept improving and now they offer pretty much the golden triangle of good sensor, good (feedback loop) EVF and by most accounts, great lenses. It remains to be seen if they will act on their temporary supremacy and cement some increasing market share by advertising what they have to a wider market. Right now they seem to be the player with the mix. If Canon and Nikon want to aim at a competitor I suggest that they study Fuji and then take their best shots. It would be a waste of capital to aim at Olympus and Panasonic. 

But really, this is all a discussion about marketing trends and the future of cameras as we know them. It’s relatively inconsequential to me and you in the short run because I really do believe that nearly every good prosumer and above camera in the current market is more than good enough to serve as an optical-mechanical conduit to my own vision. But your mileage may vary. 

I suggest that we have a bumper crop of choices in the stores right now. Enjoy it as I think the crop will hit some marked declines in the near future.  There are no “permanent” players in the camera industry and now, just like the professional photographers they serve, the companies will only be as popular as their last round of products. 

Other than that how did you enjoy the theatre Mr. Tuck? The play was hilarious and touching at the same time…. favorite camera? That was the EM5.













©2013 and beyond.  Kirk Tuck.  Please do not re-post without full attribution.  Please use the Amazon Links on the site to help me finance this site.  See my work at www.kirktuck.com

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/08/checking-in-on-the-whole-noise-bug-a-boo-theater-style-and-some-thoughts-about-current-digital-offerings/

Checking in on the whole noise bug-a-boo. Theater style. And some thoughts about current digital offerings.

Legendary Austin actor, Jaston Williams on stage at Zach Theatre.
My wonderful friends in the marketing department at Zach Theatre asked me to come and photograph  a dress rehearsal of Jaston Williams’s one man play, Maid Marian and the Stolen Car. I packed up a little bag of toys and headed over on Tues. evening. I shot primarily with two cameras and two lenses. I was sporting the Nikon D7100 camera with the 18-140mm zoom and the Olympus EM-5 (in its natty black finish…) with the 25mm f1.4 Pana/Leica lens. 
The slow zoom pushed me to shoot at 6400 ISO while the much more functional 25mm f1.4 allowed me to stick around ISO 800 with an f-stop around f2.5.
What’s my takeaway? While the D7100 is very usable for this kind of work at ISO 6400 the quickly changing light is murder on exposure consistency and the slower feedback loop of shoot/chimp/correct/shoot/chimp/re-correct means far more missed shots than when I use a camera with a good EVF. The feedback loop goes something like: view/correct/shoot/shoot/shoot. 


Yes, the finder on the Nikon is pretty and the sensor is big and gorgeous but I’ll trade all that any day for nimble, accurate and fun-to-hold-and-shoot. Yes, we could have used faster lenses on the Nikon but that would have only changed the ISO I ended up setting, not the iterative nature of shooting with a (finely made ) last century paradigm. 
Looking forward here’s what I see in camera marketing: The camera company that is most successful with professionals and advanced enthusiasts in the future will be the forward thinking company that incorporates a great APS-C sensor; a wonderful EVF that cuts down on the iteration-chain for more effective, almost intuitive, shooting, great lenses that work well wide open and good video. 
The Olympus system is almost there with the OMD EM-1 but it remains to be seen whether or not they can sustain profitability in the market long enough to continue consumer camera operations. The marketing hurdle with regards to the masses is always going to be the sensor size. It’s too bad they haven’t found a marketer/advertising agency who can succinctly and movingly explain the inherent advantages of the smaller format. ( I volunteer to give it a whirl. I couldn’t do worse….).
Panasonic is in a similar boat but they’ve made a conscious decision (I think) to cut all the consumer crap out of their line and focus on the higher end products that we enjoy. The GH4 is 95% of the way there. A bit more work on the Jpeg processing and the EVF quality and they have a good shot of staying in the marketplace and adding market share.
Nikon had a good idea with the V system but destroyed whatever advantages they had when they screwed around with the formula and went gunning for rank consumer markets instead of forward thinking pros and competent amateurs. For Nikon to truly compete going forward they desperately need to create a camera with a sensor as good as the one in the D7100 but with a mirror less configuration that features a wonderful EVF and lightning fast response.  Screw the idea of making a faux rangefinder. It’s not the size that matters to most shooters, it’s the tight feedback loop of full information we get in the EVF finders!
They have to get that figured out. If they do they can introduce cameras like the D810, the D610 and the D7100 but with brilliant EVFs instead of last century optical finders. Keep the same kinds of lenses, keep the big, hearty bodies. Fix the damn feedback loop! Oly shooters come for the size (supposedly) but they stay because of the finders. Make the finders nearly universal and a major advantage of m4:3 goes by the wayside.
I think Nikon will finally get it because they have little to fall back upon. It’s morph or die. It’s adapt or shrink into irrelevance. If they want to hedge their bets they can keep a few OVFs in the pipeline during the inevitable transition. That will make the traditionalists (over 50′s) happier.  But if they want to provide cameras for the post digital age they need to figure out that once we have almost automatic visual feedback and control we’re never, ever going back. And that includes people like Michael Reichmann who only a few years ago pissed on EVFs as not viable. Now he’s dumped all his Nikon stuff for a Sony A7r system—- partially because of the size difference but, in my opinion, his brain finally accepted the idea that seeing the final image before you pushed the button was——revolutionary, not evolutionary.
Good luck to you, Nikon. I hope you see the light and I hope it’s coming through a small, wonderful eye level screen instead of dead glass….
But onward to everyone’s current “golden boy”, Canon. The mantra is that they will survive because they’ve got the momentum. They’ll keep making the traditional DSLR cameras because they own so much of the market. And the other line I always hear is, “They have the resources to compete in mirror less any time they want.”  I maintain that they may of the resources but they lack the will and the foresight or the EOS-M would never have been such a cynically terrible camera. Deep down I’m starting to believe that they are the Japanese Kodak and they are so sure of their internal research and direction that they don’t see the bullet train heading toward them on the same track.
The sad thing for all these guys is that the entire market is changing. Cameras in general are going away. They are being incorporated into all kinds of other products. They are being relentlessly de-valued by smart phones and combo computer products like tablets. If I ran Canon right now I’d jump in and start eating my own babies by making a line of incredible mirror less cameras in the full frame and APS-C spaces that required all new lenses and all new attachments and were the first line to implement the new generation of sensors that we’ve heard is coming down the line.  And just wait until Apple successfully incorporates a great camera into a beautiful wrist watch that automatically loads the images to your iPhone….
My advice to Canon? Make a mirror free product that’s demonstrably better than any mirror less product out there. Three models: good, better, best. Launch with a full line of lenses: extremely wide zooms, fast primes and small but high performing long zooms. And toss the lion’s share of marketing into their promotion. They can “halo” the existing products. They can cannibalize sales from all the competitors. Canon has the overwhelming share of name recognition. They have the deep pockets. If they don’t follow through I’ll be waiting for their Kodak moment with their camera division. 
But wait. Isn’t there already a company out there that hits all the main criteria I’ve been pounding away at? Yep. And it’s the only company whose recent products I haven’t used. It’s Fuji. And it’s just right now that they got all their shit together in a meaningful way with the XT-1. Previous to that they had their share of software and firmware issues, zany non-compatible raw file issues, slow focusing issues and even the idiocy of launching a flagship product (the X Pro-1) without an adjustable diopter on the finder. A small point for most but they are still behind on the video front…
But to their credit they’ve kept improving and now they offer pretty much the golden triangle of good sensor, good (feedback loop) EVF and by most accounts, great lenses. It remains to be seen if they will act on their temporary supremacy and cement some increasing market share by advertising what they have to a wider market. Right now they seem to be the player with the mix. If Canon and Nikon want to aim at a competitor I suggest that they study Fuji and then take their best shots. It would be a waste of capital to aim at Olympus and Panasonic. 
But really, this is all a discussion about marketing trends and the future of cameras as we know them. It’s relatively inconsequential to me and you in the short run because I really do believe that nearly every good prosumer and above camera in the current market is more than good enough to serve as an optical-mechanical conduit to my own vision. But your mileage may vary. 
I suggest that we have a bumper crop of choices in the stores right now. Enjoy it as I think the crop will hit some marked declines in the near future.  There are no “permanent” players in the camera industry and now, just like the professional photographers they serve, the companies will only be as popular as their last round of products. 
Other than that how did you enjoy the theatre Mr. Tuck? The play was hilarious and touching at the same time…. favorite camera? That was the EM5.

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New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/08/iain-grant-at-harvard-sept-8-spirit-leverage-and-speculative-form-in-hegel-and-schelling/Iain Grant at Harvard Sept 8: Spirit, Leverage, and Speculative Form in Hegel and SchellingFor those nearby, link below.  I’m probably going to go and will post mp3.
http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/corps-perdu-spirit-leverage-and-speculative-form-hegel-and-schelling

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/08/iain-grant-at-harvard-sept-8-spirit-leverage-and-speculative-form-in-hegel-and-schelling/

Iain Grant at Harvard Sept 8: Spirit, Leverage, and Speculative Form in Hegel and Schelling

For those nearby, link below. I’m probably going to go and will post mp3.

http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/corps-perdu-spirit-leverage-and-speculative-form-hegel-and-schelling