New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/how-low-is-baldwin-lake/How low is Baldwin Lake?





So, just how LOW is Baldwin Lake (next to Big Bear Lake)?  I think these photos tell the story.  I’ve NEVER seen the lake so low.  What lake, you ask?  There really isn’t much left…sigh…

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/how-low-is-baldwin-lake/

How low is Baldwin Lake?

So, just how LOW is Baldwin Lake (next to Big Bear Lake)?  I think these photos tell the story.  I’ve NEVER seen the lake so low.  What lake, you ask?  There really isn’t much left…sigh…

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/advice-for-aspiring-full-time-photographers/Advice for Aspiring Full-Time PhotographersDetroit, 2013

Recently I gave a short 2-hour presentation on street photography at one of the photography clubs at UC Berkeley. It was great being surrounded by students again– with all of the energy, enthusiasm, and passion that college kids have.
Some of the students asked me how I went from college to surviving off photography full-time as a living. I gave some of my personal experiences– and I had the realization: perhaps this was information that may be useful to other college students (who want to make photography their living), or anyone out there with a day-job who wants to make photography their living:

Question 1: Do you want to make photography your living?
So the first question you want to ask yourself before you pursue photography full-time as a living?
I know a lot of professional photographers who become miserable after taking their passion (photography) and making it their business.
Most artists I know can easily get burnt out doing professional work– and therefore have little energy or motivation to do personal work.
To be frank– I think being a “full-time” photographer is a bit overrated.
First of all– I think you have to think the downsides of being a full-time photographer:
Unstable income (like any freelance work)
Shrinking market for photographers (everyone can afford a nice DSLR nowadays and put together half-decent professional work)
Draining your energy (photography isn’t as fun if you do it full-time for a living)
So ask yourself: why do you want to do photography full-time? Here are some reasons you might:
Flexibility of schedule
Taking photos all the time (might be a pro or a con)
Freedom of time (to perhaps travel, or structure your days how you would like)
For myself personally, I make a full-time living teaching workshops (I make about 90% of my income from workshops, around 5% from Amazon Affiliate advertisements from this blog, and 5% from other miscellaneous gigs).
The reason I am a “full-time photographer” is that I fell into it. I never intended to do it full-time as a living. I merely was passionate about street photography, started this blog, did a few workshops, got laid off my old job, and decided to see if I could do workshops for a living.
Personally I love my life because I have the freedom of my schedule and time. At the end of the day, I am more passionate about writing, researching, reading, and teaching (than photography). Therefore being my “own boss” allows me to turn off the Internet in the morning (until the evening so I don’t get distracted). I can take naps in the middle of the day. I can travel (without asking my boss). I can control the structure of my day.
Of course there are a lot of downsides, in terms of stress of getting people to signup for my workshops, dealing with finances, balancing certain opportunities (which business opportunities to say yes to, and which to say “no” to), being away from home (when traveling and teaching workshops), and the anxiety I sometimes get from becoming totally broke and homeless.
The shift of photography in the future
The way I see it– the “traditional means” of being a full-time photographer is over. The only photographers I really see making a living “shooting” photography include commercial photographers and wedding photographers.
There is nobody really making a living selling prints, selling books, or licensing photographs. Of course there is– but they are such a tiny part of the market. And now that images are ubiquitous (just check out Shutterstock) – images are pretty worthless (in the marketplace).
Furthermore, see all the newspaper photojournalist jobs? Yeah– they don’t really exist anymore. Newspapers/magazines/journals don’t really make much money anymore– and they are trying to fire everyone they can (to save money). You hear stories of photojournalists getting laid off – and regular reporters being given iPhones to take photos while they are reporting.
Also if you consider Moore’s law– cameras are just getting better and better, while the price of professional cameras are getting cheaper and cheaper.
In around 10 years– we will all probably have “full-frame” sensors in our iPhone15’s (or whatever it will be) and it will be incredibly easy to make a technically perfect image.
What is going to be scarce in the future
I think there really isn’t going to be a market for selling images in the future– as the market is currently flooded with images.
I don’t really think there will be a huge market for selling photography-related products (straps, bags, etc.) – as 3-D printing will probably take that over (or someone in China will figure out how to sell your product for cheaper).
I don’t even think there will be a huge market for wedding or commercial photography in the future (everyone will be able to make amazing photos with iPhones or Google Glass). I think there will always be “professional photographers” – but only the top .000001% of them will be making a comfortable living, while everyone else will be surviving on scraps.
Education in photography
I think the biggest frontier in the future of photography is education. As humans, we always want to learn – we are learning machines. And as the saying goes, “Everyone is now a photographer” – it is bad for professional photographers (amateur photographers shoot weddings for $  200) but good for photography teachers (everyone wants to learn).
I don’t really think there is a future for “selling content” in terms of articles, books, and videos– I imagine a future where all “content” will become free (just see what Amazon Kindle Unlimited is doing to the e-book market).
However there is something that cannot be replicated: experience. Face-to-face interaction. You cannot be replicated (unless they figure out how to clone you in the future).
What makes you unique?
I know I sound quite pessimistic in the future of photography– but I still do imagine there will always be people who will make a living from photography. But these future photographers will have to be much more creative– and think outside of the box (and also do exactly opposite of what others are doing to survive).
If you want to pursue photography full-time and just tell yourself, “Oh– I’ll just be a second-shooter as a wedding photographers, and just shoot weddings for a living” you’re in trouble. Although there won’t be a shortage of people getting married in the future– there will only be more and more wedding photographers out there, competing with each others on price, and although it might be possible to make a living as a full-time wedding photographer– you probably won’t be making a comfortable living.
Rather, think about what makes you unique. What makes you special? What gives you that edge?
For example, my manager Neil Ta currently shoots commercial and wedding photography full-time as a living (as well as helping me plan workshops and business-related ventures). What sets him apart from other wedding photographers is that he has an interest in street photography, urban landscapes, and (formerly) roof topping. He’s therefore done some engagement shoots in which he incorporates his passion and talent for urban-image making into his wedding photos.
Furthermore, he is able to stand out of the crowd by delivering over-the-top customer service. He is extremely responsive with emails, over-delivers in terms of his final images, and is a charming bastard who gets along with his clients really well.
So if you really want to go the wedding-photographer (or commercial photographer) route– think what makes you unique.
Are you currently studying computer science? Perhaps you can see if you can even design custom-made websites for your photography clients after you take their images. Or maybe even some sort of simple program (to stand from the crowd).
Are you a musician? Perhaps you can make photos of a couple – and somehow incorporate music into your final product (or even having your friends play live-music while you are doing a shoot).
Are you a writer? Maybe you can write the couple a poem, or some short story. Or perhaps put together a photography book, accompanying the images with text.
Before you quit your day job (to become a photographer)
One of the best strategies I have heard in business is the following: Don’t go broke. Before you try to become “rich” – just prevent yourself from being homeless.
So some practical strategies when (if) you decide to become a full-time photographer:
1. Have some money saved up
It is crucial to have a little money saved up– because there is nothing more stressful than quitting your job and not being able to have the financial means to pursue photography full-time.
I have heard something like have at least 3–6 months of living expenses under your belt before leaving a stable job. It is always good to have buffer space financially.
2. Realize that you can do freelance work while working a full-time job
Also realize that you don’t need to immediately quit your job. For example, I worked at my company for a year (while building up my blog) before I got laid off– and decided to pursue photography full-time.
If you have a cozy job, don’t quit your day job. Pursue your photography gigs on the weekend, and once you start earning enough money through your photography– then maybe consider quitting your job.
3. Don’t go to photography school
I think one of the biggest pieces of advice I would give to people is to avoid going to photography school. Based on all the photographers I have met– almost all of them regret going to photography school. Why? They go into massive amounts of debt ($  200,000+) and all of the technical things they could have learned via the internet. In terms of mentorship, they could have been an assistant to a working photographer – or read loads of photography-books (and perhaps even took workshops instead).
Going into debt is one of the worst things you can do to yourself. It makes you a slave – and the stress of debt is one of the worst things you can do for your creativity.
A different approach: start your own blog
I outlined some strategies which (I think) would be ideal if you want to pursue photography full-time (as a photographer).
However realize that my advice isn’t probably any good– because I have never made a full-time living just from shooting. From my understanding, it is a really tough landscape out there for working photographers (it will only get harder). So at the end of the day– I don’t actually recommend anybody out there to try to be a “working photographer” or a full-time shooter.
I think you should be more creative.
If I could give any piece of advice to a high school, college, or perhaps working person it is this: Start your own blog.
Think about it, at what other point in time could you create a platform, which could be read by millions of people around the world at no (or very little) cost? Anyone can start a WordPress blog (the one I recommend) via wordpress.com (or self-host their own).
What is the big deal with a blog?
I can only speak from personal experience– but starting a blog on street photography is the best thing I ever did in my life.
When I started my blog– there was a dearth (absence) of knowledge of street photography on the internet. There were lots of great street photographs online– but very few resources on how to shoot street photography, the best settings to use, how to compose images, and how to overcome the fear of shooting street photography.
I just started my blog as a hobby– something I did because I was passionate about it. I never intended to make it a full-time living.
But through blogging, it has brought me so many opportunities. Over the last 4+ years and 1,000+ blog posts, I have gotten invitations to exhibit my work, to curate work, to teach workshops, to write books, give lectures, etc.
I always thought the secret to becoming “successful” was to simply get lucky– and go to others and trying to get them to say “yes” to you.
I now think differently: the best way is to build up your own platform, and let others come to you.
The importance of passion
I once read something online: If you suddenly had $  100 billion dollars, and you could do anything you wanted for the rest of your life (without worrying about finances) – what would you do with your life?
Some people might say retire on a beach, travel the world, photograph– whatever.
I think it is a good idea to think of what you would want to do full-time day-to-day for the rest of your life (assuming money wasn’t an issue). Then after you figure out your ideal lifestyle, then work backwards– and figure out how you can do it financially.
For example, let’s say your passion in life is to travel and see the world. Then look for jobs (or create your own job) in which you get to travel and see the world and photograph. This can be as simple as being a tour guide, an English teacher, or perhaps you can start a blog on traveling and photography and see where that leads you.
Let’s say that your ultimate passion is street photography. Your ideal life is you wanting to shoot the streets all day. Honestly, you don’t need to be a “full-time” street photographer to do this. Perhaps you can just work a regular job, and get into work really early (6am) and get out of the office by 3pm– and just shoot from 3–7pm everyday (4 hours a day of shooting is a lot). Or perhaps if you want more flexibility, you can become a taxi-driver (or Uber driver) and only drive a few days a week (enough to pay your rent) – and then you can use the rest of your free time to shoot on the streets.
Let’s say you’re passionate about fashion. Perhaps see if you can intern at a fashion magazine, and offer to make some photographs for them. Perhaps you can suggest to do the social media for a fashion magazine, and end up working with them and other fashion photographers. And perhaps one day you can end up shooting fashion full-time.
So know what you are passionate about– and move backwards.
And you really have to be insanely passionate about what you do.
For example– I am passionate about street photography. Not just passionate– but borderline obsessive. It is literally all I think about. I eat, live, breathe, sleep, read, write street photography. I go to sleep, thinking about the next article I want to write for this blog. I go out everyday with the excitement of making a beautiful image. I am passionate about bringing other street photographers together (spreading the love) – and teaching workshops makes me feel 100% alive.
I would honestly continue doing this blog full-time and teaching full-time even if I didn’t make money doing it. I just need enough money to pay my rent and basic expenses in life– but other than that, I want to maximize my time on this earth to write, research, teach, and build a community around street photography.
If you don’t have a borderline insanity when it comes to photography– perhaps you shouldn’t pursue photography full-time. There is nothing wrong to have a full-time job and just shoot photography on the side for fun.
Conclusion
I just briefly outlined some of my ideas I have when it comes to being a “full-time photographer”. Let me recap some ideas once again:
1. Being a full-time photographer is overrated
If your passion is to shoot– perhaps you can see how you can adjust the schedule of your day-job to shoot more? The benefit of having a day-job is that it allows you the financial security to shoot purely for yourself, and not corrupting your personal work with your commercial work.
Perhaps you can wake up an hour earlier to shoot before going to work– and leave work a little earlier to shoot. Perhaps you can work only part-time, to have more time to shoot. Try to figure out how you can modify your own lifestyle before you jump off the ship and pursue photography full-time.
2. Differentiate yourself
If you want to be a full-time photographer– think how you can step outside of the box and add your unique personality and flair to your images.
Also realize you don’t need to make a full-time living just shooting street photography. Perhaps you can be a full-time photography teacher. Perhaps you can manage a team of photographers. Perhaps you can design and code a start-up which serves photographers. Perhaps you can make some revolutionary photography strap, bag, or product that allows you to be around photography. Perhaps you can start your own blog, magazine, or publication about photography (and sell advertisements in it and make a living).
Expand your horizons.
3. Follow your passion
If you aren’t insanely passionate about photography– I would say don’t even try to pursue photography as a living. You won’t survive. Someone else out there will out-work you, out hustle you, and out passion you.
You can’t fake passion– the hard work, dedication, blood, sweat, and stress that will make you great.
I hope to add some more thoughts on being a full-time photographer, and some more practical strategies and insights.
For those else of you who are full-time photographers, teachers, or whatever– what kind of tips or advice would you give aspiring photographers (who want to make it a living?) Share your thoughts in the comments below.
The post Advice for Aspiring Full-Time Photographers appeared first on Eric Kim Street Photography Blog.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/advice-for-aspiring-full-time-photographers/

Advice for Aspiring Full-Time Photographers

Americans 30 Advice for Aspiring Full Time Photographers

Detroit, 2013

Recently I gave a short 2-hour presentation on street photography at one of the photography clubs at UC Berkeley. It was great being surrounded by students again– with all of the energy, enthusiasm, and passion that college kids have.

Some of the students asked me how I went from college to surviving off photography full-time as a living. I gave some of my personal experiences– and I had the realization: perhaps this was information that may be useful to other college students (who want to make photography their living), or anyone out there with a day-job who wants to make photography their living:

Question 1: Do you want to make photography your living?

So the first question you want to ask yourself before you pursue photography full-time as a living?

I know a lot of professional photographers who become miserable after taking their passion (photography) and making it their business.

Most artists I know can easily get burnt out doing professional work– and therefore have little energy or motivation to do personal work.

To be frank– I think being a “full-time” photographer is a bit overrated.

First of all– I think you have to think the downsides of being a full-time photographer:

  • Unstable income (like any freelance work)
  • Shrinking market for photographers (everyone can afford a nice DSLR nowadays and put together half-decent professional work)
  • Draining your energy (photography isn’t as fun if you do it full-time for a living)

So ask yourself: why do you want to do photography full-time? Here are some reasons you might:

  • Flexibility of schedule
  • Taking photos all the time (might be a pro or a con)
  • Freedom of time (to perhaps travel, or structure your days how you would like)

For myself personally, I make a full-time living teaching workshops (I make about 90% of my income from workshops, around 5% from Amazon Affiliate advertisements from this blog, and 5% from other miscellaneous gigs).

The reason I am a “full-time photographer” is that I fell into it. I never intended to do it full-time as a living. I merely was passionate about street photography, started this blog, did a few workshops, got laid off my old job, and decided to see if I could do workshops for a living.

Personally I love my life because I have the freedom of my schedule and time. At the end of the day, I am more passionate about writing, researching, reading, and teaching (than photography). Therefore being my “own boss” allows me to turn off the Internet in the morning (until the evening so I don’t get distracted). I can take naps in the middle of the day. I can travel (without asking my boss). I can control the structure of my day.

Of course there are a lot of downsides, in terms of stress of getting people to signup for my workshops, dealing with finances, balancing certain opportunities (which business opportunities to say yes to, and which to say “no” to), being away from home (when traveling and teaching workshops), and the anxiety I sometimes get from becoming totally broke and homeless.

The shift of photography in the future

The way I see it– the “traditional means” of being a full-time photographer is over. The only photographers I really see making a living “shooting” photography include commercial photographers and wedding photographers.

There is nobody really making a living selling prints, selling books, or licensing photographs. Of course there is– but they are such a tiny part of the market. And now that images are ubiquitous (just check out Shutterstock) – images are pretty worthless (in the marketplace).

Furthermore, see all the newspaper photojournalist jobs? Yeah– they don’t really exist anymore. Newspapers/magazines/journals don’t really make much money anymore– and they are trying to fire everyone they can (to save money). You hear stories of photojournalists getting laid off – and regular reporters being given iPhones to take photos while they are reporting.

Also if you consider Moore’s law– cameras are just getting better and better, while the price of professional cameras are getting cheaper and cheaper.

In around 10 years– we will all probably have “full-frame” sensors in our iPhone15’s (or whatever it will be) and it will be incredibly easy to make a technically perfect image.

What is going to be scarce in the future

I think there really isn’t going to be a market for selling images in the future– as the market is currently flooded with images.

I don’t really think there will be a huge market for selling photography-related products (straps, bags, etc.) – as 3-D printing will probably take that over (or someone in China will figure out how to sell your product for cheaper).

I don’t even think there will be a huge market for wedding or commercial photography in the future (everyone will be able to make amazing photos with iPhones or Google Glass). I think there will always be “professional photographers” – but only the top .000001% of them will be making a comfortable living, while everyone else will be surviving on scraps.

Education in photography

I think the biggest frontier in the future of photography is education. As humans, we always want to learn – we are learning machines. And as the saying goes, “Everyone is now a photographer” – it is bad for professional photographers (amateur photographers shoot weddings for $ 200) but good for photography teachers (everyone wants to learn).

I don’t really think there is a future for “selling content” in terms of articles, books, and videos– I imagine a future where all “content” will become free (just see what Amazon Kindle Unlimited is doing to the e-book market).

However there is something that cannot be replicated: experience. Face-to-face interaction. You cannot be replicated (unless they figure out how to clone you in the future).

What makes you unique?

I know I sound quite pessimistic in the future of photography– but I still do imagine there will always be people who will make a living from photography. But these future photographers will have to be much more creative– and think outside of the box (and also do exactly opposite of what others are doing to survive).

If you want to pursue photography full-time and just tell yourself, “Oh– I’ll just be a second-shooter as a wedding photographers, and just shoot weddings for a living” you’re in trouble. Although there won’t be a shortage of people getting married in the future– there will only be more and more wedding photographers out there, competing with each others on price, and although it might be possible to make a living as a full-time wedding photographer– you probably won’t be making a comfortable living.

Rather, think about what makes you unique. What makes you special? What gives you that edge?

For example, my manager Neil Ta currently shoots commercial and wedding photography full-time as a living (as well as helping me plan workshops and business-related ventures). What sets him apart from other wedding photographers is that he has an interest in street photography, urban landscapes, and (formerly) roof topping. He’s therefore done some engagement shoots in which he incorporates his passion and talent for urban-image making into his wedding photos.

Furthermore, he is able to stand out of the crowd by delivering over-the-top customer service. He is extremely responsive with emails, over-delivers in terms of his final images, and is a charming bastard who gets along with his clients really well.

So if you really want to go the wedding-photographer (or commercial photographer) route– think what makes you unique.

Are you currently studying computer science? Perhaps you can see if you can even design custom-made websites for your photography clients after you take their images. Or maybe even some sort of simple program (to stand from the crowd).

Are you a musician? Perhaps you can make photos of a couple – and somehow incorporate music into your final product (or even having your friends play live-music while you are doing a shoot).

Are you a writer? Maybe you can write the couple a poem, or some short story. Or perhaps put together a photography book, accompanying the images with text.

Before you quit your day job (to become a photographer)

One of the best strategies I have heard in business is the following: Don’t go broke. Before you try to become “rich” – just prevent yourself from being homeless.

So some practical strategies when (if) you decide to become a full-time photographer:

1. Have some money saved up

It is crucial to have a little money saved up– because there is nothing more stressful than quitting your job and not being able to have the financial means to pursue photography full-time.

I have heard something like have at least 3–6 months of living expenses under your belt before leaving a stable job. It is always good to have buffer space financially.

2. Realize that you can do freelance work while working a full-time job

Also realize that you don’t need to immediately quit your job. For example, I worked at my company for a year (while building up my blog) before I got laid off– and decided to pursue photography full-time.

If you have a cozy job, don’t quit your day job. Pursue your photography gigs on the weekend, and once you start earning enough money through your photography– then maybe consider quitting your job.

3. Don’t go to photography school

I think one of the biggest pieces of advice I would give to people is to avoid going to photography school. Based on all the photographers I have met– almost all of them regret going to photography school. Why? They go into massive amounts of debt ($ 200,000+) and all of the technical things they could have learned via the internet. In terms of mentorship, they could have been an assistant to a working photographer – or read loads of photography-books (and perhaps even took workshops instead).

Going into debt is one of the worst things you can do to yourself. It makes you a slave – and the stress of debt is one of the worst things you can do for your creativity.

A different approach: start your own blog

I outlined some strategies which (I think) would be ideal if you want to pursue photography full-time (as a photographer).

However realize that my advice isn’t probably any good– because I have never made a full-time living just from shooting. From my understanding, it is a really tough landscape out there for working photographers (it will only get harder). So at the end of the day– I don’t actually recommend anybody out there to try to be a “working photographer” or a full-time shooter.

I think you should be more creative.

If I could give any piece of advice to a high school, college, or perhaps working person it is this: Start your own blog.

Think about it, at what other point in time could you create a platform, which could be read by millions of people around the world at no (or very little) cost? Anyone can start a WordPress blog (the one I recommend) via wordpress.com (or self-host their own).

What is the big deal with a blog?

I can only speak from personal experience– but starting a blog on street photography is the best thing I ever did in my life.

When I started my blog– there was a dearth (absence) of knowledge of street photography on the internet. There were lots of great street photographs online– but very few resources on how to shoot street photography, the best settings to use, how to compose images, and how to overcome the fear of shooting street photography.

I just started my blog as a hobby– something I did because I was passionate about it. I never intended to make it a full-time living.

But through blogging, it has brought me so many opportunities. Over the last 4+ years and 1,000+ blog posts, I have gotten invitations to exhibit my work, to curate work, to teach workshops, to write books, give lectures, etc.

I always thought the secret to becoming “successful” was to simply get lucky– and go to others and trying to get them to say “yes” to you.

I now think differently: the best way is to build up your own platform, and let others come to you.

The importance of passion

I once read something online: If you suddenly had $ 100 billion dollars, and you could do anything you wanted for the rest of your life (without worrying about finances) – what would you do with your life?

Some people might say retire on a beach, travel the world, photograph– whatever.

I think it is a good idea to think of what you would want to do full-time day-to-day for the rest of your life (assuming money wasn’t an issue). Then after you figure out your ideal lifestyle, then work backwards– and figure out how you can do it financially.

For example, let’s say your passion in life is to travel and see the world. Then look for jobs (or create your own job) in which you get to travel and see the world and photograph. This can be as simple as being a tour guide, an English teacher, or perhaps you can start a blog on traveling and photography and see where that leads you.

Let’s say that your ultimate passion is street photography. Your ideal life is you wanting to shoot the streets all day. Honestly, you don’t need to be a “full-time” street photographer to do this. Perhaps you can just work a regular job, and get into work really early (6am) and get out of the office by 3pm– and just shoot from 3–7pm everyday (4 hours a day of shooting is a lot). Or perhaps if you want more flexibility, you can become a taxi-driver (or Uber driver) and only drive a few days a week (enough to pay your rent) – and then you can use the rest of your free time to shoot on the streets.

Let’s say you’re passionate about fashion. Perhaps see if you can intern at a fashion magazine, and offer to make some photographs for them. Perhaps you can suggest to do the social media for a fashion magazine, and end up working with them and other fashion photographers. And perhaps one day you can end up shooting fashion full-time.

So know what you are passionate about– and move backwards.

And you really have to be insanely passionate about what you do.

For example– I am passionate about street photography. Not just passionate– but borderline obsessive. It is literally all I think about. I eat, live, breathe, sleep, read, write street photography. I go to sleep, thinking about the next article I want to write for this blog. I go out everyday with the excitement of making a beautiful image. I am passionate about bringing other street photographers together (spreading the love) – and teaching workshops makes me feel 100% alive.

I would honestly continue doing this blog full-time and teaching full-time even if I didn’t make money doing it. I just need enough money to pay my rent and basic expenses in life– but other than that, I want to maximize my time on this earth to write, research, teach, and build a community around street photography.

If you don’t have a borderline insanity when it comes to photography– perhaps you shouldn’t pursue photography full-time. There is nothing wrong to have a full-time job and just shoot photography on the side for fun.

Conclusion

I just briefly outlined some of my ideas I have when it comes to being a “full-time photographer”. Let me recap some ideas once again:

1. Being a full-time photographer is overrated

If your passion is to shoot– perhaps you can see how you can adjust the schedule of your day-job to shoot more? The benefit of having a day-job is that it allows you the financial security to shoot purely for yourself, and not corrupting your personal work with your commercial work.

Perhaps you can wake up an hour earlier to shoot before going to work– and leave work a little earlier to shoot. Perhaps you can work only part-time, to have more time to shoot. Try to figure out how you can modify your own lifestyle before you jump off the ship and pursue photography full-time.

2. Differentiate yourself

If you want to be a full-time photographer– think how you can step outside of the box and add your unique personality and flair to your images.

Also realize you don’t need to make a full-time living just shooting street photography. Perhaps you can be a full-time photography teacher. Perhaps you can manage a team of photographers. Perhaps you can design and code a start-up which serves photographers. Perhaps you can make some revolutionary photography strap, bag, or product that allows you to be around photography. Perhaps you can start your own blog, magazine, or publication about photography (and sell advertisements in it and make a living).

Expand your horizons.

3. Follow your passion

If you aren’t insanely passionate about photography– I would say don’t even try to pursue photography as a living. You won’t survive. Someone else out there will out-work you, out hustle you, and out passion you.

You can’t fake passion– the hard work, dedication, blood, sweat, and stress that will make you great.

I hope to add some more thoughts on being a full-time photographer, and some more practical strategies and insights.

For those else of you who are full-time photographers, teachers, or whatever– what kind of tips or advice would you give aspiring photographers (who want to make it a living?) Share your thoughts in the comments below.

The post Advice for Aspiring Full-Time Photographers appeared first on Eric Kim Street Photography Blog.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/visiting-hutovo-blato-part-22-the-outer-wetlands/Visiting Hutovo Blato [Part 2/2] The Outer Wetlands
The wetlands of Hutovo Blato stretch over an area of about 7,411 ha and represent one of the richest wetland reserves in Europe.

Until 1995, when the cantonal protected area was founded, Hutovo Blato represented well-known area mainly for its hunting and fishing tourism. Every winter over 200 species of birds find their shelter inside this untouched nature.

This is a two part photo series, for more check out the links below:
Part One: Inside the Nature Reserve
Part Two: The Outer Wetlands

click on the images for a bigger view

When you drive to Hutovo Blato, these are the sights that greet you on your way. You can stop your car freely on the side of the road and take a stroll.


There are only a few places in the world that harbor such a large number of species in such a small region. 


The part of the park which kept its original form and almost untouched nature is the Deransko lake which is supplied by the karstic water sources of the Trebisnjica river.







The trees offer lots of shade from the midday sun.

You can rent bicycles here for tours. These here were freshly returned, and had not been cleaned yet.



After a long walk we make it to the restaurant, part of which is on the outside.


Choosing is always the hardest thing 



We finally decided on grilled Trout, which was really delicious.



As we drive away, we take one final look at the wetlands.



I hope you enjoyed our visit to the Nature Reserve ‘Hutovo Blato’.
In the next Blog Post I will take you to a unique and isolated historical structure that we saw on our way back to Mostar. But more on that in the next post!

Linking to: Wednesday around the World, ABC Wednesday (O for Outdoors), Outdoor Wednesday, Wordless Wednesday,

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/visiting-hutovo-blato-part-22-the-outer-wetlands/

Visiting Hutovo Blato [Part 2/2] The Outer Wetlands

The wetlands of Hutovo Blato stretch over an area of about 7,411 ha and represent one of the richest wetland reserves in Europe.

Until 1995, when the cantonal protected area was founded, Hutovo Blato represented well-known area mainly for its hunting and fishing tourism. Every winter over 200 species of birds find their shelter inside this untouched nature.

This is a two part photo series, for more check out the links below:
click on the images for a bigger view

When you drive to Hutovo Blato, these are the sights that greet you on your way. You can stop your car freely on the side of the road and take a stroll.

There are only a few places in the world that harbor such a large number of species in such a small region. 

The part of the park which kept its original form and almost untouched nature is the Deransko lake which is supplied by the karstic water sources of the Trebisnjica river.

The trees offer lots of shade from the midday sun.

You can rent bicycles here for tours. These here were freshly returned, and had not been cleaned yet.

After a long walk we make it to the restaurant, part of which is on the outside.

Choosing is always the hardest thing :)

We finally decided on grilled Trout, which was really delicious.

As we drive away, we take one final look at the wetlands.

I hope you enjoyed our visit to the Nature Reserve ‘Hutovo Blato’.

In the next Blog Post I will take you to a unique and isolated historical structure that we saw on our way back to Mostar. But more on that in the next post!


New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/endangered-earth/Endangered EarthDr Abe V Rotor
In songs, verses, in gems and dance,Ethnic tribes to the modern sage,Atlantis, Gleaners, the Renaissance,All the same, the Earth’s language.
Binding Nature and Man in treaty,Through time ignored;Cloaked by progress and enmity,Nature bleeding by man’s sword.
Civilization – what’s in a name?Countless souls ensconced in a villageIn a homogenization game;Good Life rests on a pillage.
The world cries on the loss of living,While Heaven keeps sublime;Eternity lives in a Supreme Being,But never in ones lifetime.x x x

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/endangered-earth/

Endangered Earth


Dr Abe V Rotor

In songs, verses, in gems and dance,
Ethnic tribes to the modern sage,
Atlantis, Gleaners, the Renaissance,
All the same, the Earth’s language.

Binding Nature and Man in treaty,
Through time ignored;
Cloaked by progress and enmity,
Nature bleeding by man’s sword.

Civilization – what’s in a name?
Countless souls ensconced in a village
In a homogenization game;
Good Life rests on a pillage.

The world cries on the loss of living,
While Heaven keeps sublime;
Eternity lives in a Supreme Being,
But never in ones lifetime.
x x x

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/berry-good/Berry Good


If you take a moment and enjoy the taste of things the your eyes can see, you’ll be richer than you could have ever imagined.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/berry-good/

Berry Good

If you take a moment and enjoy the taste of things the your eyes can see, you’ll be richer than you could have ever imagined.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/fair-isle-august-2014/Fair Isle: August 2014Of course as many of you will know I am a “regular” to Fair Isle, this holidays was for the wedding of Karen and Inness, with me doing a bit of birding while I was there.
4th of August 2014We headed into Fair Isle on the first flight and after getting down to Quoy, I spent my first while there before going birding.I first cycled north to the Obs and spotted a Red Admiral on the way.

Red Admiral doing a bit of sunbathing by the Vaadal (Voi-del)
The first birds I had in the Havens were Rock Pipits, eleven at least and also a dried dead Octopus on the South Haven beach.

Rock Pipit

South Haven

While out on the beaches I got a text from David telling me to meet him at the Obs, I started walking up and David soon rolled up in one of the Obs’ vans.We headed inside and into the ringing room where he brought out a young Puffin! for me to ring! we took a few measurements and etc and then we let it go.The Puffin, turns out, was found by a garage, David said he thinks it was at Houll.Afterwards David and I went separate ways with me going north to the Lighthouse, I had a few birds but the only ones of note were two Swift flying south.

Arctic Skuas have had a better year on Fair Isle with about 12 chicks fledged 
It was getting close to denner so I shot off south and had six Golden Plover flying south over Barkland.Just before two I headed out again to cover the south of the Island but I was stopped by some strange moth in the window of the Schoolton Garage, I went for a closer look and my attention was drawn to a Peacock Butterfly trapped inside with this moth fluttering around!I went to Schoolton and told Nick and we caught the beauty before releasing it. I carried on south and I stopped off at Meoness.First thing I saw was what looked like a lecustic Rock Dove, this actually got me excited but I saw green rings on its legs and at a closer inspection its colours were wrong.

Racing Pigeon

A close up of its colour rings

After the Racing Pigeon flew off I decided to do Meoness once over, heading around all I got of note was an Alba Wagtail.



 Maalie (Fulmar) chick on Meoness

A very obliging Wheatear (Steynshakker) that sat on a fence post for me

5th of August 2014One thing I can’t not do on Fair Isle is go on the morning traps! the excitement of what you might catch pulls me in everytime so I headed up to the Obs at 6:30 to find some birds on my way North.Well this morning I didn’t see anything but I did get to ring two Meadow Pipits and work with a “re-trapped” Wheatear.Nick Riddiford had said to me the day before that he does Moths at 9 so after the traps I was straight to Schoolton for a bit of Mothing (the right name for it?).Nick’s Moth Trap brought up a respectable bunch with two Smokey Wainscoat, two Udea infealis (Micro Moth), four Antler Moths, twelve Ingrail Clay, three Large Yellow Underwings, twenty Dark Arches, two Eccna Ossenna (Micro Moth), one While-shouldered House Moth (Micro), one Stenophylax permistum, nine Northern Rustics, two beetles and one Sexton Beetle.Afterwards I got a few shots and we released them all back into the wild before I headed back to Quoy,

Large Yellow Underwing

Dark Arches and moth sp


Antler Moth


A Dark Arches

Ingrailed Clay


Northern Rustics


Northern Rustic (?)

Smokey Wainscoat


Moths!


The list for today

The two beetles


The Sexton Beetle

Most of my day wasn’t spent birding but the large majority was spent painting Quoy, myself, Dad, Stewart and a couple others spent the day (a sunny one it was) painting Quoy, it did have its upsides though which resulted in me hearing a Red-throated Diver somewhere on the Island (flying over), a Swallow and a moth with reddy-orange underwings!After we’d done the entire house, Stewart & Dad decided to head out fishing so I went off with them.We headed up to North Haven and got the boat ready before heading north to the sea north of the Island.The rods went down a couple of times but we just couldn’t catch anything, Steven & Tom were out as well but they only got one “fair sized” fish (the same as us).Though us fishing did attract a couple of Gulls, Herrings and a Lesser Black Back which was even ringed.


Peerie Fishy

Our “posse”


Our loyal “ringed” Lesser Black-backed Gull which stayed with us till we got past North Light


Right overhead

Heading back to North Haven we had one more try but nothing came up, we put the boat back and headed down the Isle.
Just before five I was able to head out birding again, I headed to the South, managing to pick up a couple of Waders. Redshank, Oystercatcher and Turnstones but the real surprise came from Utra when I found a female Tufted Duck and an Island tick of Ruff! (Year tick as well).

Female Tuftie on what I like to call “the Utra Pond”


Record shotted Ruff, year and Island tick

I called it a day after heading to Da Water and headed back to Quoy hoping to enjoy the end of the day but a Barred Warbler had other plans.I got a text from David saying that there was one at Schoolton! I grabbed my stuff and I was off! I had just arrived and the Obs Van pulled up a mere 20 seconds later!There was maybe six of us looking for the warbler which fluttered once and then flew 60 metres away onto a style, I took a few record shots and headed back happy with adding a new bird to my Fair Isle list! (And year).


Record Shot! Barred Warbler

But I couldn’t resist having one last check up North so by 7:30 I was crawling round Easter Lother Water hunting for Waders, managed to get a Redshank, Dunlin and Ringed Plover before going to Golden Water and finding a second female Tufted Duck!This time though I did head in as the sun was setting and the birds were going with it.

My second female Tufted Duck of the day at Golden Water, note: the white/cream patch around the base of the bill which was not present in the bird from Utra

North Cliffs and Gannet Colony

David told me that tonight would be good for “Stormies” so hoping to ring a few (and hopefully get Swinhoe’s Petrel) I went up after 11.
The traps were quickly set up and the moon was out as well, within a couple of minutes I got two different photos: featured below.


 Yellowy Moon


White Moon
The traps got pretty full of Stormies, throughout the night over 200! came in and were ringed, a couple of re-traps as well and I did a few.But there was no Swinhoe’s and he wasn’t seen again.I got home with Glen who was up on the session as well, saved me walking back!6th of August 2014I woke up late this morning for traps, nine to be exact but I had no texts so nothing rare had been caught.I got ready to head out and I had another ten minutes before I got a text from David saying that they’d just caught a Greenish Warbler in the Plantation!!I grabbed everything and I was up there like mental, not wanting to miss it. My legs were burning by the time I’d got there and Ciaran and David were just leaving.I cycled up to them and David asked me if I could go up to the Obs to spread the news, so off I was again.I dashed north telling anybody I found along the way, I got into the Obs and I went round spreading the word and soon we had a gathering of people by the ringing room.David and Ciaran arrived and the ringing started, the bird was then taken outside for photos and it was released.

Greenish Warbler, a nice start to the day

Painted Lady

I headed north after coming from the Obs and then I headed south again to Utra…..
The day is continued on…
 http://logansnatureblog.blogspot.co.uk/2014/09/red-necked-phalarope-utra-scrape.html
7th of August 2014This morning I was up for traps and out for 6:30 again with birds being seen at Barkland. 7 Oystercatchers, 2 Common Gulls, 2 Lesser Black-backs, 2 Black-headed Gulls and 2 Curlew but nothing else along the way.On the traps we caught a few things with my first Green Sandpiper of the Year flying out of the Finniquoy Gully (or just the Gully).I got to ring a Wheatear and then I headed north where I found nothing of note bar a Painted Lady.After my normal morning routine I headed out to the south and got 19 Turnstones and a Sanderling (A Fair Isle Tick for me!) on Sample, South Harbour.

Sanderling, Island tick


Glen and a kite

Next came South Light and Muckle Uri Geo, the areas in and around both pulled up a few waders and gulls, c30 Redshank, 3 Dunlin, c40 Common Gulls, 4 Black-headed Gulls and 6 Turnstones.While I was looking at these I got a text from David, they’d just caught a Wryneck in the Vaadal (Pronounced Voi-del)! I told him I was on my way.

The Wryneck!!

I don’t think I’ve ever cycled that fast, I was up there in five minutes and they were sat waiting, I plunked myself down and watched as it was pulled out of its bag and the ringing started.This was my first Wryneck on Fair Isle and a Year Tick, my first was last year and roughly the same time at Sumburgh Farm when twitching a Short-toed Lark in the mist.So after it had all been done, David got me to take a few shots of it for ageing purposes and then I watched in marvel as the Wryneck did some funny head movements, twisting its head around to look at David.Everyone split up after that and I did a bit of birding before heading back to Quoy.

I decided that today would be the day I headed up Ward Hill for a look (always hoping to head up each trip but I never quite get around to it…), I asked Dad if he wanted to come and so we set off North after denner for a look.It was an amazingly sunny day and it was hot but there was a good breeze going so we were fine, on the way up the Hill road we had twenty Skylarks, a couple of Shalders and two Ravens. We had a walk around, to the top and then to look at the Gannet Colony.

Carved into one of the huts on Ward Hill


Another one beside it

View from the top


Black & White Seals


Juvenile Skylark


Black & White Ram

We spent maybe twenty minutes watching and photographing the Colony and some Seals before I got a text from David saying that North Ronaldsay just had a Honey Buzzard flying north and they’d lost it.That started to get me excited, seeing as I’ve never seen one yet! we headed back up the northern face of Ward Hill and begun our ascent to the top to spy for this avain hunter.On the way we found a dead Bonxie, Dad got me to check the leg for a ring and there was one! so the procedure began of getting it off and after ten minutes we got it (I presume its a Fair Isle bird seeing as it’s ring number is about 100 off one bird I ringed last year).At the top we scanned and scanned for a while hoping to pick out this Buzzard but nothing so we set off back down the Hill road, we had the car and the plane was coming in so we had to wait.I got a few shots in the process.While waiting David dropped me a text saying that North Ron’s Honey Buzzard had flown back over so it didn’t come this way!

Take-off


“G-SICA is a go”

We continued down the isle and I popped into Shirva, I headed out again and I got one Willow Warbler.I walked down to Midway not expecting much but maybe a warbler, I had gotten a few metres into the Angelica and something flew up onto a wire in front of me, my eyes wandered and it was a Black Redstart!! I dipped the one a few days ago (maybe the same) and this one just flew straight towards me! I didn’t even get a chance to pull out my camera before it flew to the back of Midway.I ripped out my camera and ran after it, it was perched on a piece of pipping and I didn’t even have a chance to photograph it before it shot off!I chased it but it was gone and I didn’t see it again but it was a British tick so I was very pleased!I continued south, seeing the female Tufted Duck who was present for her third day running.A quick run around the South Light/Skaadan area pulled up a couple of Alba Wagtails, Turnstones, Rock Pipits, Oystercatchers and a Snipe.
I walked back up the road to Quoy and that nearly ended my day but I went off to twitch a Reed Warbler by Midway (Year Tick).


Sunset from Quoy

8th of August 2014I managed to sleep in this morning and also miss Nick’s Moth Trap in the process but he didn’t catch anything big so I popped over and had a look in the garden.I managed to get the Barred Warbler, also there was a few Oystercatchers in the parks.I headed down to Meoness, managing to pick out 65 Common Gulls and a Great Black-backed Gull.Next came South Harbour which brought up a Sanderling and fifteen Turnstones and a Puffin, which I caught!There must of been something wrong with the thing if it let me catch it without running away, I took a few shots and let it go (later I was told the bird was sick).

Puffin, cracking bird 

Down by Mid Geo I spotted four Sanderlings (my own Island record flock) and then I was off to the pools around South Light which brought up 6 Hooded Crows, 12 Turnstones and 9 Purple Sandpipers.Utra still had its faithful Tufted Duck (She is still present for her fifth day).On the way to Midway, the Reed Warbler was still in its patch of trees and next was the Chalet which got me a Garden Warbler.I carried on North to the Havens, they had a few birds in the shape of 5 Rock Pipits, 5 Dunlin, a Turnstone and a Alba Wagtail.

Someone’s nosey
South I went for denner and after that the South Harbour was next but it didn’t bring much but on Meoness I found 70 Common Gulls and 5 Golden Plovers.My day started to slow down from here and I headed to the South Light with Tommy to watch some golf, we did find a Common Sexton Beetle which wasn’t half bad!When I got back to Quoy, Stewart and I were debating about Red Rattle, we found the latin name the same as another plant and it was Lousewort, Triona told me where to look so I headed up to Chatham’s Land for a look.


It didn’t take me long to find it!

Also Common Ragwort


And Bird’s Foot Trefoil


Lousewort in comparison with a one pound

Dwarf Willow


Self Heal


Eyebright

Chatham’s Land

9th of August 2014Today was the day of Inness and Karen’s Wedding and it was a complete downpour throughout the day (breaking the most rainfall in twenty four hours for the Island by about 13mm) but that didn’t stop anybody (or the birds).I saw the Obs Van at the Kirk about ten minutes before ten so I decided to go and see if they’d got anything, in the weather you would of thought I was mad but they’d had a Wood Sandpiper so there is just somethings you got to do.The bird was gone so I cycled in the rain to Utra to get a few Waders, the scrape was flooded and my camera bag was nearly as well (I actually brought it with me).Utra was promising with three Ruff, a Snipe, a Greenshank and two female Teal.

Common Gulls, hundreds were around today

Greenshank in the rain


and a female Teal

I went off the find the Obs Van and I met them at the Puffinn, as soaked as me and not enjoying the weather at all.We exchanged sightings and we headed off quickly, it wasn’t worth being out.I didn’t brave the outdoors again after that, my boots were soaked through, so was my clothes and my camera bag as well (though its contents were safe).The rest of the day was spent getting ready for the wedding, while we got all ready and nice, the rain flooded everywhere, all burns were overflowing and roads were submerged, it really was like the weather was against everybody.But that stopped no-one, everyone met in the Chapel and the ceremony started. It was a great occasion being there and it was excellent.We had an hour before the Hall so we waited and headed up, there was a great meal with speeches and then the band started which went on into the early hours.It was an amazing day and congratulations to Inness and Karen of course!


10th of August 2014So it was maybe about 8;45 in the morning and I’d just gotten up from the wedding the night before, I heard people speaking in the porch so I went to have a look and it was Glen.He’d just come in asking if I wanted to go out birdwatching, I had actually just gotten up but I couldn’t decline so off we went.First we headed to Utra, there was a couple of Waders, three Ruff, one Black-tailed Godwit (Year Tick and Island Tick), 8 Teal and 22 Redshank.


Juvenile Black-tailed Godwit, nice bird for the day

Flyover Teal

We worked our way north from here getting a Greenshank at Da Water and a Willow Warbler with four Ruff at Barkland.We passed the Obs and went straight for Easter Lother Water, taking the walk up we flushed three Ruff and on Easther Lother itself there was three Greenshank!We’d been out a while so we headed to one last stop at the Obs, checking the board there wasn’tmuch news but there was a Pied Flycatcher in the Garden which we saw.

Female Pied Flycatcher
Glen put me back to Quoy and I took the day a bit slowly, I headed back out again at 11 to South Light.There was good numbers of waders with 30 Turnstones, 15 Purple Sandpipers, One Whimbrel and over 20 Redshanks.I headed over to Utra next which had a quite a few good waders with three Greenshank, two Common Sandpipers, two Ruff and two Wood Sandpipers!! (Lifers!!).

One of the Common Sandpipers


Wood Sand & Redshank!

Two Common Sandpipers


Utra Scrape
I ended up heading back after doing Utra but in the afternoon Harry & I decided to have a cycle up to the “Heinkel” wreckage, as it had been washed away slightly.We arrived and had a walk out to see that the tail of the Heinkel had been washed to the fork in the burn.

The Heinkel

After a look around we headed back for the Football Game by South Light which went well and there was a good turnout, a crowd even gathered! 

(And in fairness that was my day, I had a good rest afterwards)

11th of August 2014

The Ruff were really close






I only got out 12:00 today but it was worth it, Rob Hughes from the Obs had, had a Wood Warbler at South Reeva so that was my first stop.Almost straight away I got it on the Angelica and it was a beauty! an Island tick and a year tick as well!

Wood Warbler!

I worked my way to Midway managing to pick up five Willow Warblers and a Garden Warbler before heading back to Quoy.

Willow Warbler

Garden Warbler


The Garden Warbler again


Water Mint

Henry and I headed out birding at 3:30 and after a Lesser Whitethroat at Haa we headed to Utra.

A great Lesser Whitethroat

The Black-tailed Godwit was still there along with five Ruff and one Green Sandpiper.South Light came next and it was bucketing it down but we managed to get one Green Sandpiper, eight Dunlin, one Redshank, three Ringed Plovers and a single summer plumage Knot.

Green Sandpiper and its not flying away!

We ran back to Haa and everything pretty much stopped there for the day.

12th of August 2014This morning I was out by 9, in the first few minutes I had a Black-headed Gull and Lesser Black-backed Gull.At 5 past I was down at Haa and had a Peregrine flyover, Tommy pointed out two Greylags on Meoness which were the first of the Autumn (they took off north shortly afterwards),

Greylag Geese, first of the Autumn
I did a quick tour of Meoness, bringing up 3 Sanderling, 4 Common Sands, 14 Rock Pipits, 1 Golden Plover, 1 Green Sand and a flock of 50 Twite of Meadow Pipits but they disappeared before I could ID them.Next was Utra and it still had the odd wader in the shape of two Green Sands and a female Teal.I walked over to South Light and in Muckle Uri Geo I spotted 16 Redshanks, 1 Green Sand, 30 Turnstones, 12 Purple Sands, 3 Knot, 7 Ringed Plovers, a flyover Greenshank, 6 Dunlin and a male Pied Wagtail.I headed over to Mid Geo by “The Puffinn” and an Alba Wag was feeding on the beach and a Common Sand flew off towards Sample.North was next, Leogh had a Willow Warbler and 19 Common Gulls with a flyover Merlin between the School and Lower Stoneybrek.Finally I checked Barkland which had just under twenty Oystercatchers before I headed back south to Quoy.
I seem to have no notes on the afternoon, and I can’t remember what happened, all I have is this Arctic Skua


Nice birds, pretty cracking as well

13th of August 2014I was up for traps once again this morning! 6:30 to be exact, I was out just after this and hunting for birds before traps.At Da Water, it seemed lifeless but I spotted a dark duck, I got my eyes on it and it was a Wigeon! the first of the Autumn I think and I took a bad record shot before moving on.


First of the Autumn!

The Obs and Buness

Up North on the traps we had a Common Sand fly out of the Gully and a Chiffchaff in the Vaadal (Voi-del).I took me a while to get back as the rain was so bad! I was only back at Quoy by 9:50 and a couple of minutes before I’d had my first Grey Heron of the trip at Da Water!

Finally! took me days but I got it!!

I stayed in at Quoy for the morning and I managed to get Black-tailed Godwit and Green Sand from the kitchen window.I headed out after denner and my first good bird was a Sand Martin over the Meadow Burn! this might of even been an Island tick for me! there was also a different Green Sand.


Sand Martin, first of the Autumn as well!

Down by Haa I was getting to the edge of the Skerryholm Garage when I saw what I thought was a Merlin land and disappear 30 metres infront of me! I got my camera out and a Cuckoo flew up onto a strainer post! I got some shots and then it flew off, I went in and told Tommy and Henry.

Year tick, not bad

A second racing pigeon

South Harbour was my destination after that and there was 3 Common Sands, 7 Turnstones and 2 Sanderlings on the beach.On  my usually course I was off to Utra, a Willow Warbler was by the house and a Green Sand, Greenshank and 16 Turnstones were by the Scrape.I decided to take a different course and I headed to the cliffs by Gunglesund, I never head out this way so it was a nice change.


Orache

Fulmar


The birds too were also nice! there was 3 Ruff, 1 Green Sand and a Grey Heron (Haegrie), I also met a man who was staying at the South Light.He’d come for the Island itself, just to have a look at it.While we were talking I saw a Fieldfare (the bird which had been round the area for the past two days and it was also a trip tick).I went by Midway and that only pulled up a Willow Warbler, I decided to head north along the west cliffs and then to Pund and thats what I did.I did get one bird and that was an oiled Grey Heron by Pund which took off and disappered in the parks.Barkland pulled up four Ruff and a jaunt down to Haa at 8:10 got me a Common Whitethroat and two Green Sands!

It took me many days but I finally caught up with a Common Whitethroat this trip!

14th of August 2014I was up for traps as usual, round Barkland there was 8 Oystercatchers, 14 Twite, an Alba Wag and a Cuckoo! I’m not sure if it was roosting in the Angelica behind Chalet or if it just happened to be sitting there but anyways from here I was off on the traps.


The Cuckoo, these things are amazing!

Landing

I got to work with a couple of Wheatears which we’d trapped one was a re-trap and the other an un-ringed bird so I got to ring that.I had a quick look in the Havens before heading south again and getting the Cuckoo, a Willow Warbler and two Ruff.On quick look in at Schoolton produced a Lesser Whitethroat (different from the Haa bird?) and then I was up to Quoy for breakfast.

Lesser Whitethroat at Schoolton

I was back out again at 10:30 and my first bird was a Sand Martin by South Harbour.Henry joined me on this one and by Utra we picked up a Green Sand a couple of Alba Wags.We headed down to Mid Geo and Henry spotted a small warbler on the beach, I got my bins on it and it was a Wood Warbler!! I got some pics and texted David with the news of it.An older couple were sitting 20 metres away so we told them and showed them the bird which was a first for them.


Looking North to Puffinn, Mid Geo, South Harbour and the croft houses

We were all going around the Skaadan so we just helped each other out, Henry and I spotted a couple of birds and got the couple on it in no time.In the Obs sacrificial crop by the Puffinn we plucked out some Twite and twenty House Sparrows, the Skaadan Pool contained a few Dunlin and a Alba Wagtail, Muckle Uri Geo produced a Redshank, 4 Ringed Plovers, 13 Turnstone, 1 Sanderling, 4 Dunlin, 5 Oystercatchers, and 4 Groliks (Purple Sandpipers), down below South Light we got 3 summer plumage Knot (which quickly disappeared into the cracks and crevices), one Greenshank and a Green Sand.We met Chris from the Obs and he told us about the odd bird that was around and after that the couple, Henry and I, and Chris all headed off in separate directions.

A dried fish in a fish box would you believe

Two of the three Knot and a Greenshank on the left hand side

Henry and I worked our way north, heading to Midway and getting a Willow Warbler and by this time it was 1 so I was back into Quoy for denner.Afterwards I got a text from David, there was a warbler in the Gully that he thought it would be worth checking out, I replied to him and after a few jobs with Stewart we headed up.The first thing I saw was a few guys around the Gully trying to flush the bird into the trap but to no avail.David went off to do the plane and the other Ob’s guys went back for a mist net with Alex staying in case the bird came out.And me? well I stayed in case it came out, I sat myself on the top of the Gully and Stewart stayed for a while but headed back after twenty minutes.The Obs guys came back and an older couple came as well, the man was called John and I talked to him as the Obs boys were setting up the net.John has been here a few times, first when Ken Williamson was the warden and in his time he told me about a Red-necked Phalarope he’d seen and a Greenish Warbler on the isle.It took a while for the mist net to be put up but after two tries the bird was caught and taken back to the Obs, I walked back and when I got to the Obs the bird was being identified in the ringing room but we had to wait out side.The guys came out and said it was a Blyth’s Reed, a couple of people came and a few taken before it was taken back to the Gully.

Blyth’s Reed! Nice peerie birdy

I went up to the Plantation with the Obs to do a run of the traps, we got a Garden Warbler.Tommy and Henry arrived (I’d given them a call about the bird) and so I headed off with them.We didn’t get much but I headed down to Schoolton afterwards and got a Common Whitethroat.


Tonight was my last night of Log so I didn’t want to miss it, as usual I said my sightings, had a drink and headed back to Quoy.

15th of August 2014  After the exciting time I’ve had over the past couple of days it was finally time to leave.I had enough time to get up for the traps and see a couple of birds before I left.The highlights outside Quoy were a Black-headed Gull.I had a run south on my bike to get as much coverage as possible, in South Harbour there was a flock of 34 Redshanks and two Green Sands.I had a Grey Heron at Utra, a Willow Warbler at Midway, 2 Sand Martin at North Shirva, 2 Teal on Da Water and 3 Ruff at Chatham’s Land.

Oiled Grey Heron on Da Water


A ship on the horizon

I was checking the pond at Chalet when I saw large movement, a Grey Heron! I don’t know why but I tried to catch it, the bird had been “fulmared” by Fulmars.It couldn’t escape quickly so I moved and I grabbed on to some large grass but the ground was hollow beneath me and half of me fell into the pond (my camera side) luckily all was ok, I was a little bit wet but that was it.Still I continued onto the traps, they caught a wren, wheatear and a twite and there was also a Common Sand flying out of the Gully.I shot straight back after this, picked up my wet clothes from the Chalet and headed back to Quoy.My bag was soon packed and everything was ready, we said our goodbyes and soon headed off on the plane after a great 11 days.
Our time on Fair Isle this trip was amazing, the weather was great (for most of it) and everything had a great time at the wedding.I met a couple of new people and even found a (Fair Isle) rarity, the birds were great and so was the people. Also I would like to thank anybody who helped me in anyway during my stay.
If its an Island you want to visit, this is the one.
New species=  Wood Sandpiper
Shetland List additions=  Wood Sandpiper and Black Redstart
Fair Isle List additions= 10Year List additions = 13
Total species= 74 (same as my May trip total last year)
LapwingWheatearStarlingCurlewHouse SparrowBonxieArctic SkuaOystercatcherTwiteWrenPied WagtailBlack GuillemotFulmarDunlinTurnstoneRock PipitPuffinChiffchaffSnipeTufted DuckGreat Black-backed GullSwiftGolden PloverCommon GullHooded GullKittiwakeShagGannetMeadow PipitRedshankRinged PloverRed-throated PipitSwallowRock DoveRuffRavenBarred WarblerWillow WarblerGreenish WarblerRed-necked PhalaropeLesser Black-backed GullBlack-headed GullGreen SandpiperSanderlingWryneckSkylarkWoodpigeonBlack RedstartEiderGreenshankPurple SandpiperReed WarblerGarden WarblerTealBlack-tailed GodwitPied FlycatcherWhimbrelCommon SandpiperWood SandpiperLesser WhitethroatWood WarblerKnotGreylag GoosePeregrineComorantMerlinWigeonGrey HeronSand MartinCuckooFieldfareBlackbirdBlyth’s Reed WarblerStorm Petrel

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/fair-isle-august-2014/

Fair Isle: August 2014

Of course as many of you will know I am a “regular” to Fair Isle, this holidays was for the wedding of Karen and Inness, with me doing a bit of birding while I was there.

4th of August 2014

We headed into Fair Isle on the first flight and after getting down to Quoy, I spent my first while there before going birding.
I first cycled north to the Obs and spotted a Red Admiral on the way.

Red Admiral doing a bit of sunbathing by the Vaadal (Voi-del)

The first birds I had in the Havens were Rock Pipits, eleven at least and also a dried dead Octopus on the South Haven beach.

Rock Pipit

South Haven

While out on the beaches I got a text from David telling me to meet him at the Obs, I started walking up and David soon rolled up in one of the Obs’ vans.
We headed inside and into the ringing room where he brought out a young Puffin! for me to ring! we took a few measurements and etc and then we let it go.
The Puffin, turns out, was found by a garage, David said he thinks it was at Houll.
Afterwards David and I went separate ways with me going north to the Lighthouse, I had a few birds but the only ones of note were two Swift flying south.

Arctic Skuas have had a better year on Fair Isle with about 12 chicks fledged 

It was getting close to denner so I shot off south and had six Golden Plover flying south over Barkland.
Just before two I headed out again to cover the south of the Island but I was stopped by some strange moth in the window of the Schoolton Garage, I went for a closer look and my attention was drawn to a Peacock Butterfly trapped inside with this moth fluttering around!
I went to Schoolton and told Nick and we caught the beauty before releasing it. I carried on south and I stopped off at Meoness.
First thing I saw was what looked like a lecustic Rock Dove, this actually got me excited but I saw green rings on its legs and at a closer inspection its colours were wrong.

Racing Pigeon
A close up of its colour rings
After the Racing Pigeon flew off I decided to do Meoness once over, heading around all I got of note was an Alba Wagtail.

 Maalie (Fulmar) chick on Meoness

A very obliging Wheatear (Steynshakker) that sat on a fence post for me


5th of August 2014

One thing I can’t not do on Fair Isle is go on the morning traps! the excitement of what you might catch pulls me in everytime so I headed up to the Obs at 6:30 to find some birds on my way North.
Well this morning I didn’t see anything but I did get to ring two Meadow Pipits and work with a “re-trapped” Wheatear.
Nick Riddiford had said to me the day before that he does Moths at 9 so after the traps I was straight to Schoolton for a bit of Mothing (the right name for it?).
Nick’s Moth Trap brought up a respectable bunch with two Smokey Wainscoat, two Udea infealis (Micro Moth), four Antler Moths, twelve Ingrail Clay, three Large Yellow Underwings, twenty Dark Arches, two Eccna Ossenna (Micro Moth), one While-shouldered House Moth (Micro), one Stenophylax permistum, nine Northern Rustics, two beetles and one Sexton Beetle.
Afterwards I got a few shots and we released them all back into the wild before I headed back to Quoy,

Large Yellow Underwing
Dark Arches and moth sp

Antler Moth
A Dark Arches
Ingrailed Clay

Northern Rustics
Northern Rustic (?)
Smokey Wainscoat

Moths!
The list for today
The two beetles

The Sexton Beetle

Most of my day wasn’t spent birding but the large majority was spent painting Quoy, myself, Dad, Stewart and a couple others spent the day (a sunny one it was) painting Quoy, it did have its upsides though which resulted in me hearing a Red-throated Diver somewhere on the Island (flying over), a Swallow and a moth with reddy-orange underwings!
After we’d done the entire house, Stewart & Dad decided to head out fishing so I went off with them.
We headed up to North Haven and got the boat ready before heading north to the sea north of the Island.
The rods went down a couple of times but we just couldn’t catch anything, Steven & Tom were out as well but they only got one “fair sized” fish (the same as us).
Though us fishing did attract a couple of Gulls, Herrings and a Lesser Black Back which was even ringed.

Peerie Fishy
Our “posse”

Our loyal “ringed” Lesser Black-backed Gull which stayed with us till we got past North Light
Right overhead
Heading back to North Haven we had one more try but nothing came up, we put the boat back and headed down the Isle.
Just before five I was able to head out birding again, I headed to the South, managing to pick up a couple of Waders. Redshank, Oystercatcher and Turnstones but the real surprise came from Utra when I found a female Tufted Duck and an Island tick of Ruff! (Year tick as well).
Female Tuftie on what I like to call “the Utra Pond”

Record shotted Ruff, year and Island tick

I called it a day after heading to Da Water and headed back to Quoy hoping to enjoy the end of the day but a Barred Warbler had other plans.
I got a text from David saying that there was one at Schoolton! I grabbed my stuff and I was off! I had just arrived and the Obs Van pulled up a mere 20 seconds later!
There was maybe six of us looking for the warbler which fluttered once and then flew 60 metres away onto a style, I took a few record shots and headed back happy with adding a new bird to my Fair Isle list! (And year).

Record Shot! Barred Warbler

But I couldn’t resist having one last check up North so by 7:30 I was crawling round Easter Lother Water hunting for Waders, managed to get a Redshank, Dunlin and Ringed Plover before going to Golden Water and finding a second female Tufted Duck!
This time though I did head in as the sun was setting and the birds were going with it.

My second female Tufted Duck of the day at Golden Water, note: the white/cream patch around the base of the bill which was not present in the bird from Utra
North Cliffs and Gannet Colony
David told me that tonight would be good for “Stormies” so hoping to ring a few (and hopefully get Swinhoe’s Petrel) I went up after 11.
The traps were quickly set up and the moon was out as well, within a couple of minutes I got two different photos: featured below.
 Yellowy Moon

White Moon

The traps got pretty full of Stormies, throughout the night over 200! came in and were ringed, a couple of re-traps as well and I did a few.
But there was no Swinhoe’s and he wasn’t seen again.
I got home with Glen who was up on the session as well, saved me walking back!

6th of August 2014

I woke up late this morning for traps, nine to be exact but I had no texts so nothing rare had been caught.
I got ready to head out and I had another ten minutes before I got a text from David saying that they’d just caught a Greenish Warbler in the Plantation!!
I grabbed everything and I was up there like mental, not wanting to miss it. My legs were burning by the time I’d got there and Ciaran and David were just leaving.
I cycled up to them and David asked me if I could go up to the Obs to spread the news, so off I was again.
I dashed north telling anybody I found along the way, I got into the Obs and I went round spreading the word and soon we had a gathering of people by the ringing room.
David and Ciaran arrived and the ringing started, the bird was then taken outside for photos and it was released.

Greenish Warbler, a nice start to the day

Painted Lady

I headed north after coming from the Obs and then I headed south again to Utra…..

The day is continued on…

 http://logansnatureblog.blogspot.co.uk/2014/09/red-necked-phalarope-utra-scrape.html

7th of August 2014

This morning I was up for traps and out for 6:30 again with birds being seen at Barkland. 7 Oystercatchers, 2 Common Gulls, 2 Lesser Black-backs, 2 Black-headed Gulls and 2 Curlew but nothing else along the way.
On the traps we caught a few things with my first Green Sandpiper of the Year flying out of the Finniquoy Gully (or just the Gully).
I got to ring a Wheatear and then I headed north where I found nothing of note bar a Painted Lady.
After my normal morning routine I headed out to the south and got 19 Turnstones and a Sanderling (A Fair Isle Tick for me!) on Sample, South Harbour.

Sanderling, Island tick
Glen and a kite

Next came South Light and Muckle Uri Geo, the areas in and around both pulled up a few waders and gulls, c30 Redshank, 3 Dunlin, c40 Common Gulls, 4 Black-headed Gulls and 6 Turnstones.
While I was looking at these I got a text from David, they’d just caught a Wryneck in the Vaadal (Pronounced Voi-del)! I told him I was on my way.

The Wryneck!!

I don’t think I’ve ever cycled that fast, I was up there in five minutes and they were sat waiting, I plunked myself down and watched as it was pulled out of its bag and the ringing started.
This was my first Wryneck on Fair Isle and a Year Tick, my first was last year and roughly the same time at Sumburgh Farm when twitching a Short-toed Lark in the mist.
So after it had all been done, David got me to take a few shots of it for ageing purposes and then I watched in marvel as the Wryneck did some funny head movements, twisting its head around to look at David.
Everyone split up after that and I did a bit of birding before heading back to Quoy.

I decided that today would be the day I headed up Ward Hill for a look (always hoping to head up each trip but I never quite get around to it…), I asked Dad if he wanted to come and so we set off North after denner for a look.
It was an amazingly sunny day and it was hot but there was a good breeze going so we were fine, on the way up the Hill road we had twenty Skylarks, a couple of Shalders and two Ravens. We had a walk around, to the top and then to look at the Gannet Colony.

Carved into one of the huts on Ward Hill
Another one beside it
View from the top

Black & White Seals
Juvenile Skylark
Black & White Ram

We spent maybe twenty minutes watching and photographing the Colony and some Seals before I got a text from David saying that North Ronaldsay just had a Honey Buzzard flying north and they’d lost it.
That started to get me excited, seeing as I’ve never seen one yet! we headed back up the northern face of Ward Hill and begun our ascent to the top to spy for this avain hunter.
On the way we found a dead Bonxie, Dad got me to check the leg for a ring and there was one! so the procedure began of getting it off and after ten minutes we got it (I presume its a Fair Isle bird seeing as it’s ring number is about 100 off one bird I ringed last year).
At the top we scanned and scanned for a while hoping to pick out this Buzzard but nothing so we set off back down the Hill road, we had the car and the plane was coming in so we had to wait.
I got a few shots in the process.
While waiting David dropped me a text saying that North Ron’s Honey Buzzard had flown back over so it didn’t come this way!

Take-off
“G-SICA is a go”

We continued down the isle and I popped into Shirva, I headed out again and I got one Willow Warbler.
I walked down to Midway not expecting much but maybe a warbler, I had gotten a few metres into the Angelica and something flew up onto a wire in front of me, my eyes wandered and it was a Black Redstart!! I dipped the one a few days ago (maybe the same) and this one just flew straight towards me! I didn’t even get a chance to pull out my camera before it flew to the back of Midway.
I ripped out my camera and ran after it, it was perched on a piece of pipping and I didn’t even have a chance to photograph it before it shot off!
I chased it but it was gone and I didn’t see it again but it was a British tick so I was very pleased!
I continued south, seeing the female Tufted Duck who was present for her third day running.
A quick run around the South Light/Skaadan area pulled up a couple of Alba Wagtails, Turnstones, Rock Pipits, Oystercatchers and a Snipe.

I walked back up the road to Quoy and that nearly ended my day but I went off to twitch a Reed Warbler by Midway (Year Tick).
Sunset from Quoy

8th of August 2014

I managed to sleep in this morning and also miss Nick’s Moth Trap in the process but he didn’t catch anything big so I popped over and had a look in the garden.
I managed to get the Barred Warbler, also there was a few Oystercatchers in the parks.
I headed down to Meoness, managing to pick out 65 Common Gulls and a Great Black-backed Gull.
Next came South Harbour which brought up a Sanderling and fifteen Turnstones and a Puffin, which I caught!
There must of been something wrong with the thing if it let me catch it without running away, I took a few shots and let it go (later I was told the bird was sick).

Puffin, cracking bird 

Down by Mid Geo I spotted four Sanderlings (my own Island record flock) and then I was off to the pools around South Light which brought up 6 Hooded Crows, 12 Turnstones and 9 Purple Sandpipers.
Utra still had its faithful Tufted Duck (She is still present for her fifth day).
On the way to Midway, the Reed Warbler was still in its patch of trees and next was the Chalet which got me a Garden Warbler.
I carried on North to the Havens, they had a few birds in the shape of 5 Rock Pipits, 5 Dunlin, a Turnstone and a Alba Wagtail.

Someone’s nosey

South I went for denner and after that the South Harbour was next but it didn’t bring much but on Meoness I found 70 Common Gulls and 5 Golden Plovers.
My day started to slow down from here and I headed to the South Light with Tommy to watch some golf, we did find a Common Sexton Beetle which wasn’t half bad!
When I got back to Quoy, Stewart and I were debating about Red Rattle, we found the latin name the same as another plant and it was Lousewort, Triona told me where to look so I headed up to Chatham’s Land for a look.

It didn’t take me long to find it!
Also Common Ragwort

And Bird’s Foot Trefoil
Lousewort in comparison with a one pound
Dwarf Willow

Self Heal
Eyebright
Chatham’s Land

9th of August 2014

Today was the day of Inness and Karen’s Wedding and it was a complete downpour throughout the day (breaking the most rainfall in twenty four hours for the Island by about 13mm) but that didn’t stop anybody (or the birds).
I saw the Obs Van at the Kirk about ten minutes before ten so I decided to go and see if they’d got anything, in the weather you would of thought I was mad but they’d had a Wood Sandpiper so there is just somethings you got to do.
The bird was gone so I cycled in the rain to Utra to get a few Waders, the scrape was flooded and my camera bag was nearly as well (I actually brought it with me).
Utra was promising with three Ruff, a Snipe, a Greenshank and two female Teal.

Common Gulls, hundreds were around today
Greenshank in the rain

and a female Teal

I went off the find the Obs Van and I met them at the Puffinn, as soaked as me and not enjoying the weather at all.
We exchanged sightings and we headed off quickly, it wasn’t worth being out.
I didn’t brave the outdoors again after that, my boots were soaked through, so was my clothes and my camera bag as well (though its contents were safe).
The rest of the day was spent getting ready for the wedding, while we got all ready and nice, the rain flooded everywhere, all burns were overflowing and roads were submerged, it really was like the weather was against everybody.
But that stopped no-one, everyone met in the Chapel and the ceremony started. It was a great occasion being there and it was excellent.
We had an hour before the Hall so we waited and headed up, there was a great meal with speeches and then the band started which went on into the early hours.
It was an amazing day and congratulations to Inness and Karen of course!

10th of August 2014

So it was maybe about 8;45 in the morning and I’d just gotten up from the wedding the night before, I heard people speaking in the porch so I went to have a look and it was Glen.
He’d just come in asking if I wanted to go out birdwatching, I had actually just gotten up but I couldn’t decline so off we went.
First we headed to Utra, there was a couple of Waders, three Ruff, one Black-tailed Godwit (Year Tick and Island Tick), 8 Teal and 22 Redshank.

Juvenile Black-tailed Godwit, nice bird for the day
Flyover Teal

We worked our way north from here getting a Greenshank at Da Water and a Willow Warbler with four Ruff at Barkland.
We passed the Obs and went straight for Easter Lother Water, taking the walk up we flushed three Ruff and on Easther Lother itself there was three Greenshank!
We’d been out a while so we headed to one last stop at the Obs, checking the board there wasn’t
much news but there was a Pied Flycatcher in the Garden which we saw.

Female Pied Flycatcher

Glen put me back to Quoy and I took the day a bit slowly, I headed back out again at 11 to South Light.
There was good numbers of waders with 30 Turnstones, 15 Purple Sandpipers, One Whimbrel and over 20 Redshanks.
I headed over to Utra next which had a quite a few good waders with three Greenshank, two Common Sandpipers, two Ruff and two Wood Sandpipers!! (Lifers!!).

One of the Common Sandpipers
Wood Sand & Redshank!
Two Common Sandpipers
Utra Scrape

I ended up heading back after doing Utra but in the afternoon Harry & I decided to have a cycle up to the “Heinkel” wreckage, as it had been washed away slightly.
We arrived and had a walk out to see that the tail of the Heinkel had been washed to the fork in the burn.

The Heinkel
After a look around we headed back for the Football Game by South Light which went well and there was a good turnout, a crowd even gathered! 
(And in fairness that was my day, I had a good rest afterwards)

11th of August 2014

The Ruff were really close

I only got out 12:00 today but it was worth it, Rob Hughes from the Obs had, had a Wood Warbler at South Reeva so that was my first stop.
Almost straight away I got it on the Angelica and it was a beauty! an Island tick and a year tick as well!

Wood Warbler!

I worked my way to Midway managing to pick up five Willow Warblers and a Garden Warbler before heading back to Quoy.

Willow Warbler
Garden Warbler
The Garden Warbler again

Water Mint

Henry and I headed out birding at 3:30 and after a Lesser Whitethroat at Haa we headed to Utra.

A great Lesser Whitethroat

The Black-tailed Godwit was still there along with five Ruff and one Green Sandpiper.
South Light came next and it was bucketing it down but we managed to get one Green Sandpiper, eight Dunlin, one Redshank, three Ringed Plovers and a single summer plumage Knot.

Green Sandpiper and its not flying away!
We ran back to Haa and everything pretty much stopped there for the day.

12th of August 2014

This morning I was out by 9, in the first few minutes I had a Black-headed Gull and Lesser Black-backed Gull.
At 5 past I was down at Haa and had a Peregrine flyover, Tommy pointed out two Greylags on Meoness which were the first of the Autumn (they took off north shortly afterwards),

Greylag Geese, first of the Autumn

I did a quick tour of Meoness, bringing up 3 Sanderling, 4 Common Sands, 14 Rock Pipits, 1 Golden Plover, 1 Green Sand and a flock of 50 Twite of Meadow Pipits but they disappeared before I could ID them.
Next was Utra and it still had the odd wader in the shape of two Green Sands and a female Teal.
I walked over to South Light and in Muckle Uri Geo I spotted 16 Redshanks, 1 Green Sand, 30 Turnstones, 12 Purple Sands, 3 Knot, 7 Ringed Plovers, a flyover Greenshank, 6 Dunlin and a male Pied Wagtail.
I headed over to Mid Geo by “The Puffinn” and an Alba Wag was feeding on the beach and a Common Sand flew off towards Sample.
North was next, Leogh had a Willow Warbler and 19 Common Gulls with a flyover Merlin between the School and Lower Stoneybrek.
Finally I checked Barkland which had just under twenty Oystercatchers before I headed back south to Quoy.

I seem to have no notes on the afternoon, and I can’t remember what happened, all I have is this Arctic Skua
Nice birds, pretty cracking as well

13th of August 2014

I was up for traps once again this morning! 6:30 to be exact, I was out just after this and hunting for birds before traps.
At Da Water, it seemed lifeless but I spotted a dark duck, I got my eyes on it and it was a Wigeon! the first of the Autumn I think and I took a bad record shot before moving on.

First of the Autumn!
The Obs and Buness

Up North on the traps we had a Common Sand fly out of the Gully and a Chiffchaff in the Vaadal (Voi-del).
I took me a while to get back as the rain was so bad! I was only back at Quoy by 9:50 and a couple of minutes before I’d had my first Grey Heron of the trip at Da Water!

Finally! took me days but I got it!!

I stayed in at Quoy for the morning and I managed to get Black-tailed Godwit and Green Sand from the kitchen window.
I headed out after denner and my first good bird was a Sand Martin over the Meadow Burn! this might of even been an Island tick for me! there was also a different Green Sand.

Sand Martin, first of the Autumn as well!

Down by Haa I was getting to the edge of the Skerryholm Garage when I saw what I thought was a Merlin land and disappear 30 metres infront of me! I got my camera out and a Cuckoo flew up onto a strainer post! I got some shots and then it flew off, I went in and told Tommy and Henry.

Year tick, not bad
A second racing pigeon

South Harbour was my destination after that and there was 3 Common Sands, 7 Turnstones and 2 Sanderlings on the beach.
On  my usually course I was off to Utra, a Willow Warbler was by the house and a Green Sand, Greenshank and 16 Turnstones were by the Scrape.
I decided to take a different course and I headed to the cliffs by Gunglesund, I never head out this way so it was a nice change.

Orache
Fulmar

The birds too were also nice! there was 3 Ruff, 1 Green Sand and a Grey Heron (Haegrie), I also met a man who was staying at the South Light.
He’d come for the Island itself, just to have a look at it.
While we were talking I saw a Fieldfare (the bird which had been round the area for the past two days and it was also a trip tick).
I went by Midway and that only pulled up a Willow Warbler, I decided to head north along the west cliffs and then to Pund and thats what I did.
I did get one bird and that was an oiled Grey Heron by Pund which took off and disappered in the parks.
Barkland pulled up four Ruff and a jaunt down to Haa at 8:10 got me a Common Whitethroat and two Green Sands!

It took me many days but I finally caught up with a Common Whitethroat this trip!

14th of August 2014

I was up for traps as usual, round Barkland there was 8 Oystercatchers, 14 Twite, an Alba Wag and a Cuckoo! I’m not sure if it was roosting in the Angelica behind Chalet or if it just happened to be sitting there but anyways from here I was off on the traps.

The Cuckoo, these things are amazing!
Landing

I got to work with a couple of Wheatears which we’d trapped one was a re-trap and the other an un-ringed bird so I got to ring that.
I had a quick look in the Havens before heading south again and getting the Cuckoo, a Willow Warbler and two Ruff.
On quick look in at Schoolton produced a Lesser Whitethroat (different from the Haa bird?) and then I was up to Quoy for breakfast.

Lesser Whitethroat at Schoolton

I was back out again at 10:30 and my first bird was a Sand Martin by South Harbour.
Henry joined me on this one and by Utra we picked up a Green Sand a couple of Alba Wags.
We headed down to Mid Geo and Henry spotted a small warbler on the beach, I got my bins on it and it was a Wood Warbler!! I got some pics and texted David with the news of it.
An older couple were sitting 20 metres away so we told them and showed them the bird which was a first for them.

Looking North to Puffinn, Mid Geo, South Harbour and the croft houses

We were all going around the Skaadan so we just helped each other out, Henry and I spotted a couple of birds and got the couple on it in no time.
In the Obs sacrificial crop by the Puffinn we plucked out some Twite and twenty House Sparrows, the Skaadan Pool contained a few Dunlin and a Alba Wagtail, Muckle Uri Geo produced a Redshank, 4 Ringed Plovers, 13 Turnstone, 1 Sanderling, 4 Dunlin, 5 Oystercatchers, and 4 Groliks (Purple Sandpipers), down below South Light we got 3 summer plumage Knot (which quickly disappeared into the cracks and crevices), one Greenshank and a Green Sand.
We met Chris from the Obs and he told us about the odd bird that was around and after that the couple, Henry and I, and Chris all headed off in separate directions.

A dried fish in a fish box would you believe
Two of the three Knot and a Greenshank on the left hand side

Henry and I worked our way north, heading to Midway and getting a Willow Warbler and by this time it was 1 so I was back into Quoy for denner.
Afterwards I got a text from David, there was a warbler in the Gully that he thought it would be worth checking out, I replied to him and after a few jobs with Stewart we headed up.
The first thing I saw was a few guys around the Gully trying to flush the bird into the trap but to no avail.
David went off to do the plane and the other Ob’s guys went back for a mist net with Alex staying in case the bird came out.
And me? well I stayed in case it came out, I sat myself on the top of the Gully and Stewart stayed for a while but headed back after twenty minutes.
The Obs guys came back and an older couple came as well, the man was called John and I talked to him as the Obs boys were setting up the net.
John has been here a few times, first when Ken Williamson was the warden and in his time he told me about a Red-necked Phalarope he’d seen and a Greenish Warbler on the isle.
It took a while for the mist net to be put up but after two tries the bird was caught and taken back to the Obs, I walked back and when I got to the Obs the bird was being identified in the ringing room but we had to wait out side.
The guys came out and said it was a Blyth’s Reed, a couple of people came and a few taken before it was taken back to the Gully.

Blyth’s Reed! Nice peerie birdy

I went up to the Plantation with the Obs to do a run of the traps, we got a Garden Warbler.
Tommy and Henry arrived (I’d given them a call about the bird) and so I headed off with them.
We didn’t get much but I headed down to Schoolton afterwards and got a Common Whitethroat.

Tonight was my last night of Log so I didn’t want to miss it, as usual I said my sightings, had a drink and headed back to Quoy.

15th of August 2014  

After the exciting time I’ve had over the past couple of days it was finally time to leave.
I had enough time to get up for the traps and see a couple of birds before I left.
The highlights outside Quoy were a Black-headed Gull.
I had a run south on my bike to get as much coverage as possible, in South Harbour there was a flock of 34 Redshanks and two Green Sands.
I had a Grey Heron at Utra, a Willow Warbler at Midway, 2 Sand Martin at North Shirva, 2 Teal on Da Water and 3 Ruff at Chatham’s Land.

Oiled Grey Heron on Da Water
A ship on the horizon

I was checking the pond at Chalet when I saw large movement, a Grey Heron! I don’t know why but I tried to catch it, the bird had been “fulmared” by Fulmars.
It couldn’t escape quickly so I moved and I grabbed on to some large grass but the ground was hollow beneath me and half of me fell into the pond (my camera side) luckily all was ok, I was a little bit wet but that was it.
Still I continued onto the traps, they caught a wren, wheatear and a twite and there was also a Common Sand flying out of the Gully.
I shot straight back after this, picked up my wet clothes from the Chalet and headed back to Quoy.
My bag was soon packed and everything was ready, we said our goodbyes and soon headed off on the plane after a great 11 days.

Our time on Fair Isle this trip was amazing, the weather was great (for most of it) and everything had a great time at the wedding.
I met a couple of new people and even found a (Fair Isle) rarity, the birds were great and so was the people.
Also I would like to thank anybody who helped me in anyway during my stay.

If its an Island you want to visit, this is the one.

New species=  Wood Sandpiper
Shetland List additions=  Wood Sandpiper and Black Redstart
Fair Isle List additions= 10
Year List additions = 13
Total species= 74 (same as my May trip total last year)

Lapwing
Wheatear
Starling
Curlew
House Sparrow
Bonxie
Arctic Skua
Oystercatcher
Twite
Wren
Pied Wagtail
Black Guillemot
Fulmar
Dunlin
Turnstone
Rock Pipit
Puffin
Chiffchaff
Snipe
Tufted Duck
Great Black-backed Gull
Swift
Golden Plover
Common Gull
Hooded Gull
Kittiwake
Shag
Gannet
Meadow Pipit
Redshank
Ringed Plover
Red-throated Pipit
Swallow
Rock Dove
Ruff
Raven
Barred Warbler
Willow Warbler
Greenish Warbler
Red-necked Phalarope
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Black-headed Gull
Green Sandpiper
Sanderling
Wryneck
Skylark
Woodpigeon
Black Redstart
Eider
Greenshank
Purple Sandpiper
Reed Warbler
Garden Warbler
Teal
Black-tailed Godwit
Pied Flycatcher
Whimbrel
Common Sandpiper
Wood Sandpiper
Lesser Whitethroat
Wood Warbler
Knot
Greylag Goose
Peregrine
Comorant
Merlin
Wigeon
Grey Heron
Sand Martin
Cuckoo
Fieldfare
Blackbird
Blyth’s Reed Warbler
Storm Petrel

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/touchscreen-landscapes/Touchscreen Landscapes[Image: Screen grab via military.com].
   This new, partly digital sand table interface developed for military planning would seem to have some pretty awesome uses in an architecture or landscape design studio.
 Using 3D terrain data—in the military’s case, gathered in real-time from its planetary network of satellites—and a repurposed Kinect sensor, the system can adapt to hand-sculpted transformations in the sand by projecting new landforms and elevations down onto those newly molded forms. 
 You can thus carve a river in real-time through the center of the sandbox, and watch as projected water flows in— [Image: Screen grabs via military.com].
 —or you can simply squeeze sand together into new hills, and even make a volcanic crater.
 [Image: Screen grabs via military.com].
 The idea of projecting adaptive landscape imagery down onto a sandbox is brilliant; being able to interact with both the imagery and the sand itself by way of a Kinect sensor is simply awesome.  Imagine scaling this thing up to the size of a children’s playground, and you’d never see your kids again, lost in a hypnotic topography of Minecraft-like possibilities, or just donate some of these things to a landscape design department and lose several hours (weeks?) of your life, staring ahead in a state of geomorphic Zen at this touchscreen landscape of rolling hills and valleys, with its readymade rivers and a thousand on-demand plateaus. 
 The military, of course, uses it to track and kill people, filling their sandbox with projections of targeting coordinates and geometric representations of tanks.
  [Image: Screen grabs via military.com].
 But there’s no reason those coordinates couldn’t instead be the outlines of a chosen site for your proposed architecture project, or why those little clusters of trucks and hidden snipers couldn’t instead be models of new buildings or parks you’re hoping will be constructed. Watch the original video for more. 
 (Spotted via the Quartz Daily Brief).

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/touchscreen-landscapes/

Touchscreen Landscapes

[Image: Screen grab via military.com].

This new, partly digital sand table interface developed for military planning would seem to have some pretty awesome uses in an architecture or landscape design studio.

Using 3D terrain data—in the military’s case, gathered in real-time from its planetary network of satellites—and a repurposed Kinect sensor, the system can adapt to hand-sculpted transformations in the sand by projecting new landforms and elevations down onto those newly molded forms.

You can thus carve a river in real-time through the center of the sandbox, and watch as projected water flows in—

[Image: Screen grabs via military.com].

—or you can simply squeeze sand together into new hills, and even make a volcanic crater.

[Image: Screen grabs via military.com].

The idea of projecting adaptive landscape imagery down onto a sandbox is brilliant; being able to interact with both the imagery and the sand itself by way of a Kinect sensor is simply awesome.

Imagine scaling this thing up to the size of a children’s playground, and you’d never see your kids again, lost in a hypnotic topography of Minecraft-like possibilities, or just donate some of these things to a landscape design department and lose several hours (weeks?) of your life, staring ahead in a state of geomorphic Zen at this touchscreen landscape of rolling hills and valleys, with its readymade rivers and a thousand on-demand plateaus.

The military, of course, uses it to track and kill people, filling their sandbox with projections of targeting coordinates and geometric representations of tanks.

[Image: Screen grabs via military.com].

But there’s no reason those coordinates couldn’t instead be the outlines of a chosen site for your proposed architecture project, or why those little clusters of trucks and hidden snipers couldn’t instead be models of new buildings or parks you’re hoping will be constructed.

Watch the original video for more.

(Spotted via the Quartz Daily Brief).

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/visiting-the-california-science-center-with-young-kids/Visiting The California Science Center With Young Kids
Triangles, Lines, Squares & Circle - Los Angeles, California
The California Science Center, located in Exposition Park near downtown Los Angeles, is a free museum. That’s right, free. Well, not entirely free, but we’ll get to that later.
I recently visited the California Science Center with my family, including three children all under the age of seven. Would this place keep us entertained? Would little ones actually learn something?

Pianist - Los Angeles, California

We were greeted by a modern structure. From the outside the place looks interesting. On one side is an IMAX theater, on the other the California Science Center, and in the middle is a covered courtyard with  some modern art that appears to be based on outer space.

We didn’t visit the IMAX theater. They have several different movie options (all documentaries), but we didn’t come to see a movie. Ticket prices are about the same as any other movie theater. 



Two At A Window - Los Angeles, California
Inside the museum are a bunch of different exhibits on three different floors. The permanent exhibits are free, the traveling exhibits (plus a few other things) cost money. The traveling exhibit Pompeii was there for our visit, but the arm-and-leg price tag convinced us not to see it.
One of the permanent exhibits that we spent a lot of time in was Ecosystems. This exhibit is subdivided into eight “zones” that explain the different ecosystems found on Earth. Within this area is the Family Discovery Room that is for children seven-years-old and younger. There is also a large fish tank, and at certain times of the day you can watch scuba divers feed the different fish.


On Mars - Los Angeles, California

Honestly, I think we could have spent most of the day in Ecosystems. The kids had a blast and learned a lot. There are plenty of hands-on learning opportunities. Some favorites were Extreme Zone, River Zone and the fish tank.
Another exhibit that we spent some time in was Creative World. There are five areas within this exhibit: Communication, Structures, Transportation, Tech Lab and Discovery Room (another seven-years-old-and-younger area). While I think my kids were a little young for some things in Creative World, there were enough age appropriate activities and displays to keep them entertained. 

Learning At The Science Center - Los Angeles, California

A highlight for my five-year-old son was all of the rockets, satellites and other space objects on display. Most of these are not hands-on, but he loved them anyway.

The space shuttle Endeavour is on display in a separate structure that is accessed through the museum. It sometimes costs money and it is sometimes free. It was free on our visit. This exhibit underwhelmed me, and I felt it could have been a lot better (I think it is a work in progress). However, my son said it was his favorite part of the trip.


Cactus Hotel - Los Angeles, California

There are plenty of other things to do and see in the California Science Center, and we didn’t get to them all. We spent several hours there and only went through about half of the museum. This could be an all-day adventure.



If you should make it an all-day trip, there is a cafeteria with some different food and beverage options. All are overpriced, of course, but it is good to have refreshments available. 


Hands On Learning - Los Angeles, California

At the top of this post I asked, “Would this place keep us entertained?” The answer is a resounding yes. Even after several hours my kids did not want to leave. They were disappointed that it was time to go. Several days after our visit my six-year-old daughter wanted to know when we’d go back.

I also asked, “Would little ones actually learn something?” Surprisingly, yes. On the way home my kids were pointing things out, telling us why things were they way they were. They actually absorbed quite a bit.


Building Corner - Los Angeles, California

The California Science Center is free, but don’t expect the trip to be free. Parking is not free ($  10 per car, I think). The IMAX theater isn’t free. Some exhibits and activities are not free. The food certainly isn’t free. I’m not complaining. I’m simply suggesting that you should be prepared to spend some money.

If you find yourself in the Los Angeles area, the Science Center is a great place to both entertain and educate children. This is can be an inexpensive stop, yet one that the kids will be talking about for days.


Three At A Window - Los Angeles, California

All of these photographs were captured using a Nikon D3300 DSLR. I post-processed them using Alien Skin Exposure 6 software.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/visiting-the-california-science-center-with-young-kids/

Visiting The California Science Center With Young Kids

Triangles, Lines, Squares & Circle - Los Angeles, California
The California Science Center, located in Exposition Park near downtown Los Angeles, is a free museum. That’s right, free. Well, not entirely free, but we’ll get to that later.

I recently visited the California Science Center with my family, including three children all under the age of seven. Would this place keep us entertained? Would little ones actually learn something?

Pianist - Los Angeles, California
We were greeted by a modern structure. From the outside the place looks interesting. On one side is an IMAX theater, on the other the California Science Center, and in the middle is a covered courtyard with  some modern art that appears to be based on outer space.
We didn’t visit the IMAX theater. They have several different movie options (all documentaries), but we didn’t come to see a movie. Ticket prices are about the same as any other movie theater. 
Two At A Window - Los Angeles, California
Inside the museum are a bunch of different exhibits on three different floors. The permanent exhibits are free, the traveling exhibits (plus a few other things) cost money. The traveling exhibit Pompeii was there for our visit, but the arm-and-leg price tag convinced us not to see it.

One of the permanent exhibits that we spent a lot of time in was Ecosystems. This exhibit is subdivided into eight “zones” that explain the different ecosystems found on Earth. Within this area is the Family Discovery Room that is for children seven-years-old and younger. There is also a large fish tank, and at certain times of the day you can watch scuba divers feed the different fish.

On Mars - Los Angeles, California
Honestly, I think we could have spent most of the day in Ecosystems. The kids had a blast and learned a lot. There are plenty of hands-on learning opportunities. Some favorites were Extreme Zone, River Zone and the fish tank.

Another exhibit that we spent some time in was Creative World. There are five areas within this exhibit: Communication, Structures, Transportation, Tech Lab and Discovery Room (another seven-years-old-and-younger area). While I think my kids were a little young for some things in Creative World, there were enough age appropriate activities and displays to keep them entertained. 

Learning At The Science Center - Los Angeles, California
A highlight for my five-year-old son was all of the rockets, satellites and other space objects on display. Most of these are not hands-on, but he loved them anyway.
The space shuttle Endeavour is on display in a separate structure that is accessed through the museum. It sometimes costs money and it is sometimes free. It was free on our visit. This exhibit underwhelmed me, and I felt it could have been a lot better (I think it is a work in progress). However, my son said it was his favorite part of the trip.
Cactus Hotel - Los Angeles, California
There are plenty of other things to do and see in the California Science Center, and we didn’t get to them all. We spent several hours there and only went through about half of the museum. This could be an all-day adventure.
If you should make it an all-day trip, there is a cafeteria with some different food and beverage options. All are overpriced, of course, but it is good to have refreshments available. 
Hands On Learning - Los Angeles, California
At the top of this post I asked, “Would this place keep us entertained?” The answer is a resounding yes. Even after several hours my kids did not want to leave. They were disappointed that it was time to go. Several days after our visit my six-year-old daughter wanted to know when we’d go back.
I also asked, “Would little ones actually learn something?” Surprisingly, yes. On the way home my kids were pointing things out, telling us why things were they way they were. They actually absorbed quite a bit.
Building Corner - Los Angeles, California
The California Science Center is free, but don’t expect the trip to be free. Parking is not free ($ 10 per car, I think). The IMAX theater isn’t free. Some exhibits and activities are not free. The food certainly isn’t free. I’m not complaining. I’m simply suggesting that you should be prepared to spend some money.
If you find yourself in the Los Angeles area, the Science Center is a great place to both entertain and educate children. This is can be an inexpensive stop, yet one that the kids will be talking about for days.
Three At A Window - Los Angeles, California
All of these photographs were captured using a Nikon D3300 DSLR. I post-processed them using Alien Skin Exposure 6 software.
New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/randomness-judge-joe-brown-vs-judge-judy-vs-judge-dredd/Randomness: Judge Joe Brown vs. Judge Judy vs. Judge DreddI’m just going to spout off a bunch of random shiat tonight.  First: The classic film ‘Frankenhooker’ (c. 1990) is screening this Friday at the Plaza, and they are giving away free condoms with the titular character on the packaging.  See you there?  Second: I recently thought of an awesome mashup movie – Judge Joe Brown vs. Judge Judy vs. Judge Dredd.  Oh man, that would be a battle of the badassest – is that the proper superlative for ‘badass’? - I AM THE LAW types!   Third:  When I try to text the word ‘Cindy’ on my phone, my fat fingers inevitably type ‘Condy’ which makes me laugh like a moron every time.  What’s wrong with me?  Fourth: if a caucasian working husband is called a breadwinner, am I the ‘rice winner’?  Fifth: Is it wrong that I was kind of disappointed that the Oilers ended their chances for an 82 game losing streak by chalking up a win last night?  Sixth:  I asked Anita if she wanted to join me for a run tonight.  Her response?  “WHAAT?!! NOOOO!!”  Ladies and Gents, meet my athlete wife.
Okay, enough of that.  It’s been a trying week for yours truly, and I can’t string together anything more coherent than the above.  Enjoy a couple random creepy weird photos I shot recently.

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/randomness-judge-joe-brown-vs-judge-judy-vs-judge-dredd/

Randomness: Judge Joe Brown vs. Judge Judy vs. Judge Dredd

I’m just going to spout off a bunch of random shiat tonight. First: The classic film ‘Frankenhooker’ (c. 1990) is screening this Friday at the Plaza, and they are giving away free condoms with the titular character on the packaging. See you there? Second: I recently thought of an awesome mashup movie – Judge Joe Brown vs. Judge Judy vs. Judge Dredd. Oh man, that would be a battle of the badassest – is that the proper superlative for ‘badass’? - I AM THE LAW types! Third: When I try to text the word ‘Cindy’ on my phone, my fat fingers inevitably type ‘Condy’ which makes me laugh like a moron every time. What’s wrong with me? Fourth: if a caucasian working husband is called a breadwinner, am I the ‘rice winner’? Fifth: Is it wrong that I was kind of disappointed that the Oilers ended their chances for an 82 game losing streak by chalking up a win last night? Sixth: I asked Anita if she wanted to join me for a run tonight. Her response? “WHAAT?!! NOOOO!!” Ladies and Gents, meet my athlete wife.

Okay, enough of that. It’s been a trying week for yours truly, and I can’t string together anything more coherent than the above. Enjoy a couple random creepy weird photos I shot recently.

Creepy-1

Creepy-2

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/yellow-throated-vireo/Yellow-throated VireoI am linking up with Wild Bird Wednesday and Nature Notes
For this week’s Wild bird I am sharing the Yellow-throated Vireo, he visited my yard on Sep 14.

 The Yellow-throated Vireo..have a yellow throat and a white belly.

The tail and white are dark and they have white wing bars..

They have blue-grey legs and a stout bill..  A pretty yardbird, I was happy to see it stop by..
Thanks for stopping by my post and for all the nice comments.
Join in and post your birdies and to see more beautiful and wonderful bird photos please visit: Stewart’s Wild Bird Wednesday and Michelle’s  Nature Notes.
Thanks to both of our hosts… Michelle for Nature Notes and our host  Stewart of Wild Bird Wednesday.  Happy Birding and have a wonderful  week!

New Post has been published on http://blog.jannews.net/2014/10/yellow-throated-vireo/

Yellow-throated Vireo

I am linking up with Wild Bird Wednesday and Nature Notes

For this week’s Wild bird I am sharing the Yellow-throated Vireo, he visited my yard on Sep 14.

 The Yellow-throated Vireo..have a yellow throat and a white belly.

The tail and white are dark and they have white wing bars..

They have blue-grey legs and a stout bill..  A pretty yardbird, I was happy to see it stop by..

Thanks for stopping by my post and for all the nice comments.

Join in and post your birdies and to see more beautiful and wonderful bird photos please visit:
 Stewart’s Wild Bird Wednesday and Michelle’s  Nature Notes.

Thanks to both of our hosts… Michelle for Nature Notes and our host Stewart of Wild Bird Wednesday.  Happy Birding and have a wonderful week!